milking

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milk

 (mĭlk)
n.
1. A whitish liquid containing proteins, fats, lactose, and various vitamins and minerals that is produced by the mammary glands of all mature female mammals after they have given birth and serves as nourishment for their young.
2. The milk of cows, goats, or other animals, used as food by humans.
3. Any of various potable liquids resembling milk, such as coconut milk or soymilk.
4. A liquid resembling milk in consistency, such as milkweed sap or milk of magnesia.
v. milked, milk·ing, milks
v.tr.
1.
a. To draw milk from the teat or udder of (a female mammal).
b. To draw or extract a liquid from: milked the stem for its last drops of sap.
2. To press out, drain off, or remove (a liquid): milk venom from a snake.
3. Informal
a. To draw out or extract something from: milked the witness for information.
b. To obtain money or benefits from, in order to achieve personal gain; exploit: "The dictator and his cronies had milked their country of somewhere between $5 billion and $10 billion" (Russell Watson).
c. To obtain the greatest possible advantage from (a situation).
d. To get the greatest effect from (a line or scene in a play, for example).
v.intr.
1. To yield or supply milk.
2. To draw milk from a female mammal.
Idiom:
milk it
To take advantage of the help or kindness of others, as when one acts as if one still needs help after recovering from an illness.

[Middle English, from Old English milc; see melg- in Indo-European roots.]

milk′er n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

milking

(ˈmɪlkɪŋ)
n
(Agriculture) the act of removing or extracting milk from the udders or mammary glands of an animal such as a cow, goat, or sheep
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations

milking

[ˈmɪlkɪŋ]
A. ADJlechero, de ordeño
B. Nordeño m
C. CPD milking machine Nordeñadora f mecánica
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

milking

[ˈmɪlkɪŋ] ntraite f
to do the milking → faire la traitemilking machine ntrayeuse fmilk jug npot m à lait
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

milking

nMelken nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

milking

[ˈmɪlkɪŋ] nmungitura
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

milk·ing

n. ordeño, maniobra para forzar sustancias fuera de un tubo; sacar leche.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The presence of unhealthy bacteria in milk can be due to poor milking hygiene or any infection in mammary gland of the mammal.
Non-probability statistical tests proposed grazing type, milk yield, feeding system, body condition, milker's hand hygiene, milking hygiene, germicidal teat dip practice, antibiotics' use, peri-parturition hygiene, and disease management assistance were significantly associated with risk of onset of subclinical mastitis in the under study population of goats.
Other management factors: Practice good milking hygiene, regular deworming, supplement feeds with mineral salts, have sick animals attended to by qualified vets, provide plenty of clean drinking water and you should also put in place a breeding programme, preferably with the use of artificial insemination.
Furthermore, the questionnaire was designed to gain information on the purpose of keeping goats, an estimation of milk yields and lactation length, milking hygiene, and the consumption of raw milk, and the commercialization of milk and meat.