millhand

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Translations

millhand

[ˈmɪlhænd] Nobrero/a m/f, operario/a m/f
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References in periodicals archive ?
1917 : Two 15-year-old millhands from Armitage Bridge admitted stealing apples worth 6d by taking them off trees.
Eller's Miners, Millhands, and Mountaineers: Industrialization of the Appalachian South, 1880-1930.
The CIO's organizing efforts "scared the daylights" out of South Carolina Senator Ellison Durant "Cotton Ed" Smith, Bryant Simon, A Fabric of Defeat: The Politics of South Carolina Millhands, 1910-1948, at 197 (1998), and, during the 1948 Texas Democratic primary, a segregationist congressman received a report that '"Negroes outnumbering whites almost 3-1 were led by CIO and AF of L leaders,' and this mutual cooperation forced the retreat of the Dixiecrats," Lawson, supra note 112, at 127.
We are told that there was a great battle here, but the blood, sweat, tears, fear, rage, and dying of all those Yankee farm boys and millhands and immigrant cannon fodder never receives even a hint.
In response, the millhands struck, calling for the restoration of lost pay balanced by a reduction in the number of hours worked.
He is the author of Creating the Modem South: Millhands and Managers in Dalton, Georgia 1884-1984 (1992), Bound for Freedom: Black Los Angeles in tim Crow America (2005), and African Americans in the West (2009).
43) Bryant Simon, A Fabric of Defeat: The Politics of South Carolina Millhands 1920-1948 (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1998), 67.
Even when that story appeared in the local newspaper, millhands in Floyd County still reported to work.
See generally BRYANT SIMON, A FABRIC OF DEFEAT: THE POLITICS OF SOUTH CAROLINA MILLHANDS, 1910-1948 (1998).
Fales, "Artisans, Millhands, and Laborers: The Mormons and Leeds and Their Nonconformist Neighbors," in Mormons in Early Victorian Britain, ed.
Abstract This study explores new and traditional forms of leisure enjoyed by white southern rural millhands at Banning Mill between 1910 and the 1930s.
In particular Weise takes issue with the first "wave" of Appalachian social history of the 1980's--Ron Eller's Miners, Millhands and Mountaineers, Paul Salstrom's The Path to Dependence and my own, Hatfields, McCoys and Social Change in Appalachia.