mimetite


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Related to mimetite: pyromorphite

mimetite

(ˈmɪmɪˌtaɪt; ˈmaɪmɪ-)
n
(Minerals) a rare secondary mineral consisting of a chloride and arsenate of lead in the form of white or yellowish needle-like hexagonal crystals. Formula: Pb5Cl(AsO4)3
[C19: from German, from Greek mimētēs imitator (of pyromorphite)]
References in periodicals archive ?
Klee, "The vibrational spectra of pyromorphite, vanadinite and mimetite," Spectrochimica Acta A: Molecular Spectroscopy, vol.
These include arsentsumebite, tsumebite, corkite, fornacite, duftite, caledonite, kettnerite, linarite, leadhillite, brochantite, mimetite, pyromorphite, vanadinite and wulfenite.
Outstanding wulfenite from the Ojuela mine, with caramel-colored, blocky crystals to 3 cm on beds of green mimetite, may now be seen at dozens of dealerships.
Two German dealers had about 100 specimens each from a mimetite discovery made, just a month before the show, in an "old classic" locality in the southern Black Forest, namely the Haus Baden mine at Badenweiler, Baden-Wurttemburg.
The witherite, calcite, fluorite, barite, linarite, barytocalcite and plumbogummite have never been beaten, mimetite from Dry Gill (the variety known as campylite) is unique, and the recent finds of boracite from Boulby mine have set new standards for the species.
barytocalcite, hematite, quartz, aragonite, siderite, linarite, caledonite and mimetite.
The pyromorphite, plumbogummite, hemimorphite and mimetite from the Caldbeck Fells were, and remain, among the finest the world has ever seen.
The eminent mineral chemist Thomas Thomson bought a specimen labeled "vanadiate of lead" from "Caldbeck fell" from this dealer and, upon analyzing it, pronounced it a new mineral: a "native diarseniate of lead." It was almost certainly mimetite van campylite from Dry Gill mine, Caldbeck.
Mimetite Pingtouling Mine, Liannan Co., Guangdong Prov., China 1 1/2 tall
Shortly after that show Burnham went on a collecting trip through the Southwest and Mexico, coming back with specimens of wulfenite and mimetite from the Ojuela mine, boasting that "advanced collectors who have seen this [material] have enthusiastically acclaimed it, without exception, to rank with the world's finest specimens." He also offered tetrahedrite in large (half-inch and up) crystals with brilliant pyritohedral pyrite from Utah, in cabinet-size specimens to $25.
A few of the matrix pieces show areas of botryoidal green mimetite (as before) and of pearly white calcite microcrystals (as not before).
The natural assumption is that these lead species (as well as the mediocre San Carlos mimetite specimens which have occasionally appeared) came from secondary mineralized zones in or around the argentiferous galena pods (see below).