mineralogist


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min·er·al·o·gy

 (mĭn′ə-rŏl′ə-jē, -răl′-)
n. pl. min·er·al·o·gies
1. The study of minerals, including their distribution, identification, and properties.
2. A book or treatise on mineralogy.

min′er·a·log′i·cal (-ər-ə-lŏj′ĭ-kəl) adj.
min′er·a·log′i·cal·ly adv.
min′er·al′o·gist n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mineralogist - a scientist trained in mineralogymineralogist - a scientist trained in mineralogy  
scientist - a person with advanced knowledge of one or more sciences
Translations

mineralogist

[ˌmɪnəˈrælədʒɪst] Nmineralogista mf

mineralogist

nMineraloge m, → Mineralogin f

mineralogist

[ˌmɪnəˈrælədʒɪst] nmineralogista m/f
References in classic literature ?
One was a mineralogist, a scientific, green-spectacled figure in black, bearing a heavy hammer, with which he did great damage to the precipices, and put the fragments in his pocket.
Among the company at the door were the mineralogist and the owner of the gold opera glass whom we had encountered in the Notch; two Georgian gentlemen, who had chilled their southern blood that morning on the top of Mount Washington; a physician and his wife from Conway; a trader of Burlington, and an old squire of the Green Mountains; and two young married couples, all the way from Massachusetts, on the matrimonial jaunt, Besides these strangers, the rugged county of Coos, in which we were, was represented by half a dozen wood-cutters, who had slain a bear in the forest and smitten off his paw.
The mineralogist and the physician talked about the invigorating qualities of the mountain air, and its excellent effect on Ethan Crawford's father, an old man of seventy-five, with the unbroken frame of middle life.
I made inquiries whether, in his researches about these parts, our mineralogist had found the three 'Silver Hills' which an Indian sachem sold to an Englishman nearly two hundred years ago, and the treasure of which the posterity of the purchaser have been looking for ever since.
Anyhow, the deputation of distinguished geologists and mineralogists from Paris and Berlin were there in the most magnificent and appropriate dress, for there are no men who like wearing their decorations so much as the men of science--as anybody knows who has ever been to a soiree of the Royal Society.
In a new study led by Caltech mineralogist Chi Ma, scientists analysed the Wedderburn meteorite and verified the first natural occurrence of what they call 'edscottite': a rare form of iron-carbide mineral that's never been found in nature.
Per a recent study led by Caltech mineralogist Chi Ma, the red-and-black rock is now revealed to contain our (https://www.sciencealert.com/mineral-never-seen-in-nature-found-buried-in-heart-of-mysterious-meteorite) first-everA natural encounter with a mineral they called 'edscottite.' According to the research, the mineral is apparently a rare type of iron-carbide, and it's never been found in nature before.
Petroleum (term first used in the treatise De Natura Fossilium published in 1546 by the German mineralogist Georg Bauer) is a naturally occurring, flammable liquid found in rock formations in the Earth consisting of a complex mixture of hydrocar-bons of various molecular weights, plus other organic compounds.
Foit Jr., "Crystal chemistry of alkali-deficient schorl and tourmaline structural relationships," American Mineralogist, vol.
The analysis, published in the April American Mineralogist, even provides clues about where scientists and rock hounds should look and what recipes and atomic arrangements such minerals might have.
"The Government Geologists' Laboratory was one of the earlier buildings on the museum grounds, and the WA Museum's geological collection includes specimens collected by the Government Geologist and Chief Mineralogist from those early days," the Minister said.
The study was published in American Mineralogist. [SOURCE: redorbit.com]