mining bee


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mining bee

n
(Animals) a solitary bee of the genera Andrena and Halictus, which sometimes resemble honey bees
[named from their burrowing habits]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mining bee - a bee that is a member of the genus Andrenamining bee - a bee that is a member of the genus Andrena
bee - any of numerous hairy-bodied insects including social and solitary species
genus Andrena - a solitary burrowing short-tongued bee
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
a) Chocolate mining bee b) Hairy-footed flower bee c) Long-horned bee d) Blue bumblebee | FOR more bee fun see friendsofthe earth.uk/bees/ bees-fun-facts-andactivities-children
Bumble bees (Bombus spp.), the eastern carpenter bee (Xylocopa virginica L.), several species of halictids, the honey bee (Apis mellifera L.), the mining bee (Svastra atripes Cresson), and the leaf-cutter bee (Megachile brevis Say) were found to be common visitors of partridge pea flowers (Robertson, 1890; Hardin et al., 1972; Thorp and Estes, 1975; Wolfe and Estes, 1992; Williams et at, 2015).
Another plant chemical, called diterpenoids occurring in Rhododendrons, were found to be poisonous to honeybees and a wild mining bee species.
In June this year, Gold Fields sold a 15% stake to another mining BEE, Mvelaphanda Resources, for R4.1bn ($625m) in order to comply with the five year ruling.
The spring beauty mining bee is active when the spring beauty is in bloom.
There are scores of species of mining bees but they are not very distinctive, being mainly small (mostly a few millimetres long) dark, furry insects, often with orange or brown hairs on their abdomens, hence the name of one of the most common - the tawny mining bee.
A vernal mining bee, confined to the sandhills of Wales and north-west England, which will benefit PICTURE: Carl Clee
Some are solitary, spending life alone, like the wood mining bee. Some form colonies like bumble bees and honey bees.
One type of bee, the mining bee, makes its nest under lawns and paths, leaving a small conical mound of earth on the surface, but this can be scattered before mowing and doesn''t need drastic action.
One type of bee, the mining bee, makes its nest under lawns and paths, leaving a small conical mound of earth on the surface, but this can simply be scattered before mowing and doesn't need drastic action.
The mining bee makes its nest under lawns and paths, leaving a conical mound of earth on the surface, but this can be scattered before mowing and doesn't need drastic action.

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