minischool


Also found in: Wikipedia.

min·i·school

 (mĭn′ē-sko͞ol′)
n.
1. An alternative school offering specialized or one-on-one instruction.
2. A small school serving as an addition to or an extension of a larger one.

minischool

(ˈmɪnɪˌskuːl)
n
(Education) a school at which pupils are taught through one-to-one tuition
References in periodicals archive ?
For the purpose of promoting gender studies in the region, a week-long Gender Studies Minischool was organized in October 1999 by the Central European University in Budapest, Hungary--a private university also founded by George Soros in 1991.
One way in which this impact has been felt is through the rise of a "literary Darwinism." Trumpeted as "the next big thing" in The New York Times, (3) this minischool proceeds from premises laid out by evolutionary psychology and sociobiology, and is often, though by no means always, hostile to the last four decades of literary theory.
He also offers a minischool for adults and kids to learn what it's like to work on a racing team.
In its project, Building School Capacity to Improve Student Learning, the Academy for Educational Development (AED) sought to "build the capacity of school faculties to improve the quality of instruction in middle-grades schools, through a continuous, comprehensive, and critical review of student work."8 Teachers in minischool grade-level teams constructed interdisciplinary "learning goals" to guide the ways they considered student work.
Even while gangs of attaches roamed Cite Soleil, ruthlessly ridding it of all public mention of the exiled president, Bohnen maintained a large banner over one minischool that said, "Father Aristide, Old Grad."
1, 1993 Description: Church Construction Minischool: An intensive, practical, interactive course for pastors, parish staffs, parish lay council and committee members, diocesan officials, etc., contemplating a building or renovation project.
Approximately one-fifth of the students signed up for a "computer minischool" that now involves eight classrooms and spans grades 4 through 6.
In such places, choice can entail very long bus rides or bizarre efforts to subdivide a school with a half-dozen teachers into three different minischools. Washington should take care that it doesn't push such communities into foolish, compliance-driven exertions and should write choice-enabling legislation so that it permits federal funds to be used for the full panoply of educational choices (including online learning, which can be especially valuable in rural areas).
The study reveals that: (1) 53 percent of all New York City elementary school buildings and annexes are overcrowded and continue to operate at 99 percent or greater capacity; (2) in 10 school districts, 70 percent or more of elementary school buildings are operating at 99 percent or greater capacity; (3) minischools and transportables, both ways to quickly increase capacity, are also overcrowded; and (4) over the last year, New York City collected less than 31 percent of the state's reimbursable school building aid despite enrolling almost 40 percent of the state's students.
Norfolk and Newport News, Virginia, both turned formerly all-white elementary schools over to their black school systems in order to deter an impending desegregation ruling from the courts.[47] Norfolk even built six minischools, with five rooms each, to ensure the single-race composition of their attendance zones.[48]
The Ascot Vale Primary School, with approximately 350 children, uses multi-age grouping in two of its four minischools; curriculum is integrated across subjects and grades.
It is shifting its middle or junior high schools from large schools (typical of New York and other cities), with a thousand or more children, into minischools or alternative schools, with at most a few hundred children.