mints


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mints

plural of mint; aromatic herbs; candies; produces money: mints coins
Not to be confused with:
mince – cut into very small pieces: mince onions; soften or moderate one’s words: mince words; to walk with short dainty steps: She minces along like a little girl.

mint 1

 (mĭnt)
n.
1. A place where the coins of a country are manufactured by authority of the government.
2. A place or source of manufacture or invention.
3. An abundant amount, especially of money.
tr.v. mint·ed, mint·ing, mints
1. To produce (money) by stamping metal; coin.
2. To invent or fabricate: a phrase that was minted for one occasion.
adj.
Undamaged as if freshly minted: The painting was in mint condition.

[Middle English, from Old English mynet, coin, from Latin monēta; see money.]

mint′er n.

mint 2

 (mĭnt)
n.
1. A member of the mint family.
2.
a. Any of various rhizomatous plants of the genus Mentha of the mint family, characteristically having nearly regular white or purple flowers. Some species are cultivated for their aromatic oil and foliage.
b. The leaves of some of these plants, used as a seasoning.
3. Any of various similar or related plants, such as the stone mint.
4. A candy flavored with natural or artificial mint flavoring.

[Middle English minte, from Old English, from Germanic *minta, from Latin menta, possibly from Greek minthē.]

mint′y adj.
References in classic literature ?
Whilst the alloy and value depended on the general authority, a right of coinage in the particular States could have no other effect than to multiply expensive mints and diversify the forms and weights of the circulating pieces.
The magistrates soon began to suspect that the mint master would have the best of the bargain.
My husband had this excellence, that he valued nothing of expense; and as his history, you may be sure, has very little weight in it, 'tis enough to tell you that in about two years and a quarter he broke, and was not so happy to get over into the Mint, but got into a sponging-house, being arrested in an action too heavy from him to give bail to, so he sent for me to come to him.
Sage and thyme, and mint and two onions, and some parsley.
Whatever we paid for in Barkingham was paid for in the genuine Mint coinage.
Its price had been a napoleon, and a napoleon, just then, was a mint of money in her eyes.
If my start from Camelot could have been delayed a very few days I could have paid these people in beautiful new coins from our own mint, and that would have pleased me; and them, too, not less.
for ye pay tithe of mint, and anise, and cumin, and have omit- ted the weightier matters of the law, judgment, mercy, and faith; these ought ye to have done, and not to leave the other undone.
For my part, as I was not much use at carrying, I was kept busy all day in the cave packing the minted money into bread-bags.
They have authority to appoint and receive ambassadors; to execute treaties and alliances already formed; to provide for the collection of duties on imports and exports; to regulate the mint, with a saving to the provincial rights; to govern as sovereigns the dependent territories.
The war with Spain, many years' generous mint and watermelon crops, a few long-shot winners at the New Orleans race-track, and the brilliant banquets given by the Indiana and Kansas citizens who compose the North Carolina Society have made the South rather a "fad" in Manhattan.
It strikes off money faster than the dies of the Royal Mint itself.