misadventurer

misadventurer

(ˌmɪsədˈvɛntʃərə)
n
a person who experiences misadventure or misfortune
References in periodicals archive ?
Those episodes about the innocent misadventurer, Owen Skye, were best-loved gifts; so, of course, Alan reused the idea and wrote more stories for different occasions until he had another collection.
Coleridge had been an opium user since his schooldays, and his ultimate reliance on the drug had been public knowledge since at least 1821, if not since 1798 with the publication of Charles Lloyd's roman a clef Edmund Oliver, in which a thinly disguised Coleridge appears as a misadventurer in a perpetual fog of opium.
(All of us have disabilities, but there is a difference in degree that is a difference in kind, socio-politically.) For example, Martin Norden in his 1994 book, The Cinema of Isolation, distinguishes ten specific disabled character types that have evolved over the years in Hollywood films, from the Comic Misadventurer to the High-Tech Guru.
Misadventurers Don Quixote and Sancho Panza were blissfully unconcerned about matters such as zoonotic infections when they trotted off on their humble mounts toward the next windmill on the horizon.
"People feel like there's nothing but order everywhere, and so they love to be a part of just one thing that nobody was expecting." Bill's comments were echoed by a Singapore flash mob, which identified its members as "urban misadventurers bent on breaking up the blah ...
We misadventurers are not alone, however, and we come by our aimlessness honestly.
Such critical misadventurers, opines Cunningham, produce "failures with fact" that are also "clear failures of tact," "trampl[ing] all over the poem" (p.