misappraisal

misappraisal

(ˌmɪsəˈpreɪzəl)
n
a wrong or improper appraisal
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
One result of this mythologizing is a frequent misappraisal of her work--the academic literature on Carter, for example, has "tended to stress her feminist consciousness at the expense of everything else" (417).
There has been a misappraisal of the Gulen movement on our side."
Williams, "Cognitive Misappraisal in Oscar Wilde's Lady Windermere's Fan" (51-65); Elizabeth M.
The HIPAA-NICS NPRM therefore seems to be predicated on a misappraisal of the HIPAA Privacy Rule's relation to NICS and an overarching desire to address the national fear of gun violence by those who are mentally ill without engaging in a thorough analysis of the rule's necessity and impact.
These findings can be discussed in relation to current cognitive theories of OCD which attribute the development of compulsions to the misappraisal of intrusive thoughts, leading to ineffective strategies to manage the intrusions.12 It has been suggested that individuals with OCD may have impaired self-perceptions which may lead to such dysfunctional responses, such as catastrophic interpretations of the significance of intrusive thoughts13,14 and an overinflated personal responsibility for harm.15,16
He is not the president any longer -- and he lost his presidency through a wilful misappraisal of what could or could not work in the Egyptian context.
The misappraisal of benign stimuli as signaling danger can lead to a proliferation of threat signals with fear-eliciting potential and presumably represents a core feature of pathological fear (e.g., Lissek et al., 2005; Lissek et al., 2009).
The issue was not about a misappraisal of the requirements of dismantling the tents of refugees of Saharan origin who had put forth social demands.
This failure leads him to a radical misappraisal of his own example.
Where the possibility of metaphysics as a science is concerned, Kant assigns the exact sciences the function of an exemplar; for these disciplines have long been well established on "the secure path of a science."(4) Accordingly, in the Prolegomena Kant explicitly addresses the question "How is metaphysics possible as a science?" by way of the questions "How is pure mathematics possible?" and "How is pure natural science possible?"(5) Moreover, all these questions arise directly out of the main transcendental question: "How are synthetic judgments a priori possible?" The deplorable situation of the metaphysics of the day would have been entirely attributable to misappraisal of this central transcendental question.(6)
Professor Berk's narrow definition of fixed costs leads to a misappraisal of the Chandlerian model as overly deterministic and insensitive to the ways that contingent political and legal developments could shape cost structures.
But then the danger of misappraisal asserts itself.