misappreciation

misappreciation

(ˌmɪsəˌpriːʃɪˈeɪʃən)
n
failure to appreciate something fully or properly
References in periodicals archive ?
"That is a total misappreciation of the significance of the ruling and is a betrayal of national interest," he said.
'Simply stated, no grave abuse of discretion may be attributed to the Ombudsman merely because of its alleged misappreciation of facts and evidence.
However, he admits that there might be a misapprehension or misappreciation from the security side, quoting the Murphys Law: If anything can go wrong, it will go wrong.
Intuitions about combining opinions: Misappreciation of the averaging principle.
Coll shows how a lack of trust and a misappreciation of deeply held security and cultural narratives among the United States, Pakistan, and Afghanistan--as well as between frequently competing U.S.
"We are suffering in Lebanon from misappreciation and mismanagement in dealing with pending issues," the MP told "Voice of Lebanon" radio.
(28) Seldom is DNA destiny and the predictive value of any individual genetic marker available today is low, but it is a misappreciation of the science to disregard the importance of inheritance.
"Our insane asylums are full of women, who, leaning on some human heart for love and sympathy, and meeting only misappreciation have gone there, past the Cross, where alone they could have laid down burdens too heavy to bear unshared .
Explaining why Rajhi had been dismissed from the Interior Ministry, the Interim PM said that contrary to what the latter had claimed he had been replaced owing to his poor performance and his misappreciation of the machinery of the State.
"When the real negotiations started, Europe was absent," he observed, denouncing this "misappreciation of how to proceed".
The disclosure through litigation of incidents or practices that violate national policies respecting nondiscrimination in the work force is itself important, for the occurrence of violations may disclose patterns of noncompliance resulting from a misappreciation of the Act's operation or entrenched resistance to its commands, either of which can be of industry-wide significance.
In his book TheBattle for Germany (NewYork: Scribner, 1969), Hubert Essame writes, "In misappreciation of actual situation at the end of August and the first half of September, Allied intelligence staffs sank to a level only reached by Brigadier John Charteris, Haig's Chief Intelligence Officer at the time of the Passchendaele Battles in 1917....