misassumption

misassumption

(ˌmɪsəˈsʌmpʃən)
n
a wrongful or incorrect assumption
References in periodicals archive ?
Posey, who has conducted cause-marketing and reputation-management initiatives for Kraft and British Airways Inc., says there is "a fundamental misassumption that CSR engagement can be scaled down to fit SMEs."
Put most tersely, as spoken by one of the maquiladora managers Wright has quoted, both systems seem built on and keen to perpetuate one key misassumption: "The men like to stand.
Turns out part of the reason solar power has never compared well to fossil-fuel generated energy has been a fundamental misassumption about how to price the power.
That's making the gross misassumption that governments and police in democratic countries are wholly benign or infallible.
Truth be told, I once made that misassumption. In 1993.
Rich locates this problematic turn in feminist film theory as an "overvaluation of the production aspect of cinema" and a "misassumption that cinematic values are irrevocably embedded at the level of production and, once there, remain pernicious and inviolable." (20) The crucial point to take from Rich is that such an analysis reinforces the view that, "[w]oman is absent on the screen and she is absent in the audience." (21) The paradox here is that in negating or suppressing the female image from cinema, these theories silenced and disempowered women from being active participants in the filmmaker/spectator dialogue even more.
This reveals a possibly hidden but dangerous misassumption that men with disabilities are less vulnerable to mistreatment by virtue of their maleness, ignoring the significant change in power dynamics inherent in the disability experience, regardless of gender.
at 145-46 ("[T]he resignation was submitted and accepted under a fundamental misassumption as to the position petitioner was relinquishing.").
A common misassumption is that your facility will need a bank of computers so that staff can train online all at the same time.
Characteristically, Arkin provides a combination of key data and penetrating analysis of an initially hesitant air campaign based on the strategic misassumption that Milosevic would fold after a couple of days of token bombing.
But there is an underlying misassumption we make in this drive for engineering credibility and consistency.
It is partly understandable why this misassumption is so widespread: because of the precedence effect (the ear's being captured by the early-arriving sound), all the sound of a loudspeaker seems to come right from it, directly to your ears.