misbelief


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mis·be·lief

 (mĭs′bĭ-lēf′)
n.
1. A wrong or faulty belief.
2. A heretical or unorthodox religious belief.

misbelief

(ˌmɪsbɪˈliːf)
n
a false or unorthodox belief

mis•be•lief

(ˌmɪs bɪˈlif)

n.
erroneous belief; false opinion.
[1200–1250]

Misbelief

 of painters; painters collectivelyBk. of St. Albans, 1486.
Translations

misbelief

nirrige Annahme; (Rel) → Irrglaube m
References in periodicals archive ?
More broadly, their work forms part of a noteworthy body of research debunking the longstanding misbelief that tends to correlate Anglo-French with the elite of society alone.
In our study, risk of dependency was the main concern of our patients besides other factors, another misbelief was to stop or decrease insulin therapy when sugar was controlled thinking that the disease was cured.
"I support the president's effort to denuclearize them, but I do not have a misbelief of who this leader is."
As long as market participants believe in the superiority of such "objective" methods of business appraisal, subjectivists can make use of that misbelief in order to reach a preferable negotiation result (e.g., Matschke and Brosel, 2013, p.
Dr Nighat Shah, Assistant professor at JSMU, described her own experience of encountering new kinds of superstitions and misbelief regarding contraception in Urban educated population that were unheard of a few years ago.
European Union (EU) Commission President Claude Juncker came away from Washington on July 25 pocketing an outline deal with President Trump to "work together" towards "zero" tariffs, other barriers, subsidies--a whole shopping list ranging from automobiles to soya beans and natural gas, trade standards and "unfair global trade practices." Faced with this menu embracing the sublime and paltry, sceptics on both sides of the Pond will be forgiven misbelief. Why didn't they think of this earlier?
Roy Gottfried, in Joyce's Misbelief argues that Joyce takes a heretical stance not to challenge the validity of faith, but rather to promote autonomy in issues of belief, aesthetics, and political and cultural identity.
"You always have a bit of self misbelief coming up to the races, thinking 'am I being too greedy and running him too quick.'.
He shows the consequences of the misbelief of the translator that the task is to write to an audience of children who are not capable of understanding the more eloquent elements in Andersen's aesthetic language.
At the same time, this shared civilization exists in tension with Saracen misbelief, a problem that Sir John identifies with incorrect reading practice.
McKay, R, R Langdon, and M Coltheart, 2007, "Models of Misbelief: Integrating Motivational and Deficit Theories of Delusions," Consciousness and Cognition 16(4), pp.