miscegenist

miscegenist

(mɪˈsɛdʒɪˌnɪst)
n
another word for miscegenator
adj
advocating miscegenationof or relating to miscegenation
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
In "Thomas Jefferson and Slaves," Jefferson historian Bruce Fehn notes that he was also a miscegenist: "In a letter to Edward Coles, Jefferson described slaves as 'children' and interracial unions as producing what he termed a 'degradation.'" And, just as his beliefs about the biological inferiority of people of African descent undoubtedly shaped American attitudes about race, his beliefs about interracial unions were also likely significant in shaping not only attitudes about interracial unions but also the legal enforcement of this prohibition.
In this way the poem accomplishes, Thomas Sutpen-like, a denial of the mixed race problems of an American miscegenist genealogy.
In crude terms, the juxtaposition of black and white races in unexpected and previously sacrosanct collaborations triggers the play of miscegenist fears.
The black woman's association with food provokes white fear of miscegenist communion--the fear of the black maternal body as a sacrament she drunk as a babe, an irrational and paradoxical fear mirrored in the scenes of Northern meals where white women refuse to eat with Linda.
Shuffling an international alphabet of critics, from Althusser to (Slavoj) Zizek, Lott is almost as polymorphously perverse and miscegenist as minstrelsy itself.
Shuffling an international alphabet of cxritics, from Althusser to (Slavoj) Zizek, Lott is almost as polymorphously perverse and miscegenist as minstrelsy itself.