mischance


Also found in: Thesaurus.

mis·chance

 (mĭs-chăns′)
n.
1. An unfortunate occurrence; a mishap.
2. Bad luck.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

mischance

(mɪsˈtʃɑːns)
n
1. bad luck
2. a stroke of bad luck
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

mis•chance

(mɪsˈtʃæns, -ˈtʃɑns)

n.
1. a mishap.
2. bad luck.
[1250–1300; Middle English < Old French]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mischance - an unpredictable outcome that is unfortunatemischance - an unpredictable outcome that is unfortunate; "if I didn't have bad luck I wouldn't have any luck at all"
fortune, hazard, luck, chance - an unknown and unpredictable phenomenon that causes an event to result one way rather than another; "bad luck caused his downfall"; "we ran into each other by pure chance"
2.mischance - an instance of misfortunemischance - an instance of misfortune    
accident - an unfortunate mishap; especially one causing damage or injury
near miss - an accidental collision that is narrowly avoided
derailment - an accident in which a train runs off its track
ground loop - a sharp uncontrollable turn made by an airplane while moving along the ground
misfortune, bad luck - unnecessary and unforeseen trouble resulting from an unfortunate event
puncture - loss of air pressure in a tire when a hole is made by some sharp object
trip, slip - an accidental misstep threatening (or causing) a fall; "he blamed his slip on the ice"; "the jolt caused many slips and a few spills"
crash - (computer science) an event that causes a computer system to become inoperative; "the crash occurred during a thunderstorm and the system has been down ever since"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

mischance

noun misfortune, accident, mishap, disaster, bad luck, calamity, misadventure, bummer (slang), contretemps, bad break (informal), ill fortune, ill luck, infelicity, ill chance By some mischance, the two letters were lost in the post.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

mischance

noun
An unexpected and usually undesirable event:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
سوء حَظ
smůla
uheld
óheppni
neveiksme

mischance

[mɪsˈtʃɑːns] Ndesgracia f, mala suerte f
by some mischancepor desgracia
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

mischance

[mɪsˈtʃɑːns] nmalchance f
by some mischance → par malheur
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

mischance

nunglücklicher Zufall; by some mischancedurch einen unglücklichen Zufall
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

mischance

[ˌmɪsˈtʃɑːns] n by (some) mischanceper sfortuna
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

mischance

(misˈtʃaːns) noun
(a piece of) bad luck.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
'I think,' answered the bean, 'that as we have so fortunately escaped death, we should keep together like good companions, and lest a new mischance should overtake us here, we should go away together, and repair to a foreign country.'
You contemplate mentally your mischance, till little by little your mood changes, cold doubt steals into the very marrow of your bones, you see the inexplicable fact in another light.
Realizing his mischance, he smiled; central New York is not a region of perils, nor does one long remain lost in it.
That, immediately, on a signal, the prisoner was removed to the interior of the prison again; but, that he, the Doctor, had then so strongly pleaded for permission to remain and assure himself that his son-in-law was, through no malice or mischance, delivered to the concourse whose murderous yells outside the gate had often drowned the proceedings, that he had obtained the permission, and had remained in that Hall of Blood until the danger was over.
He would have been discovered by the beating of his heart, if by any mischance the jailers had entered at that moment.
Or perhaps you were out of spirits at the time, or angry with Thedora about something, or worried about some mischance? Ah, but you should read him sympathetically, and, best of all, at a time when you are feeling happy and contented and pleasantly disposed-- for instance, when you have a bonbon or two in your mouth.
She felt all the perverseness of the mischance that should bring him where no one else was brought, and, to prevent its ever happening again, took care to inform him at first that it was a favourite haunt of hers.
A combination of sickness and mischance found the stage stables short a driver.
He belonged to Bagdad, and joined my ship at Balsora, but by mischance he was left behind upon a desert island where we had landed to fill up our water-casks, and it was not until four hours later that he was missed.
That it was abundantly sufficient to reconcile the mind to any of these mischances, to reflect that they are liable to befal the wisest of mankind, and are undoubtedly for the good of the whole." He said, "It was a mere abuse of words to call those things evils, in which there was no moral unfitness: that pain, which was the worst consequence of such accidents, was the most contemptible thing in the world;" with more of the like sentences, extracted out of the second book of Tully's Tusculan questions, and from the great Lord Shaftesbury.
One of his most intimate friends was a merchant who, from a flourishing state, fell, through numerous mischances, into poverty.
In attempting to trace the course of a love affair, the French romancers of the seventeenth century had recourse to a device called the carte du tendre--a map which treated the progress of affection through all the pleasant territories of Inclination, Complaisance, Tenderness, and Respect and all the hostile areas of Pride, Negligence, Indiscretion, and Mischance. Pride and Prejudice explores much the same geography of the feelings, but never abstractly and always against the familiar background of the English landscape.