miscredit

miscredit

(ˌmɪsˈkrɛdɪt)
vb (tr)
to credit or attribute to wronglyto disbelieve
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in classic literature ?
If we had a quick voyage it would be no to our miscredit wi'the owners, or no hurt to our traffic, an' the Old Mon who had served his ain purpose wad be decently grateful to us for no hinderin' him."
At the same time, however, there is still a tendency to miscredit herbal medicinal products, even those with a long record of safe and controlled use as prescription drugs, such as Ginkgo biloba.
The news item "Grad Grants" (May/June '10), about projects funded by ART Alumni Association, miscredited two productions: Macb**h was directed and created by Craig Baldwin, not Aysan Celik, who was a performer and producer on the piece.
The latter in a more neutral consulting language is: being miscredited for doing a study that does not really meet what is being expected by the client.
The section on Othello discusses the 1984 Brazilian film Otelo De Oliveira, as well as O, a recent (2000) updating of the play through the lens of high school basketball (unfortunately the film's director, Tim Blake Nelson, is miscredited as Tim Blake Smith).
Sergeant Bob Cryer (Eric Richard, pictured) visits Dale Smith and warns if it can be proven that Kennedy fired the gun inside the house, he won't be able to plead it was self defence and his accusations against Smith will be miscredited.
The effects of pervasive exposure to lower levels of lead are more easily miscredited; lead poisoning has been called an "aping disease" because its symptoms are so frequently those of other known ailments.
Also, the review of Sharon Lockhart's show miscredited the design of the new Blum & Poe gallery; Escher Gune Wardena Architecture designed the space.