misdescribe


Also found in: Legal.

mis·de·scribe

 (mĭs′dĭ-skrīb′)
tr.v. mis·de·scribed, mis·de·scrib·ing, mis·de·scribes
To describe wrongly or falsely.

mis′de·scrip′tion (-skrĭp′shən) n.

misdescribe

(ˌmɪsdɪˈskraɪb)
vb (tr)
to provide false or misleading information about (a product, service, etc)
References in periodicals archive ?
While private sellers cannot misdescribe items, they can omit information.
First, the mark must misdescribe the goods or services.
For AMD Royale to misdescribe and misdeclare the shipments as kitchenware and tableware clearly showed their intent to bring sugar through illegal means, Lina added.
"Because we have so much documentary evidence, a witness who sought to hold something back or misdescribe something would be on a loser because we already have all the factual underpinning," he said.
"Interpreters," he contends, "can surely misdescribe their experiences, and this complicates matters." To confront this worrisome possibility, one might hope for more philosophical assurance--if not rigor--than this: "that interpreters can be wrong about these experiences does not prevent the possibility of them being right about them" (18).
We do not misdescribe a student of the fine arts merely by referring to him as 'the uncultured-man' or 'the cultured-man' nor do we misdescribe a perambulating friend by calling him 'Coriscus-in-the-Lyceum' and 'Coriscus-in-the-market-place'.
The 47-page document went on: "In the process, they omit important facts, misdescribe others, attribute arguments to the government it never made, and assume this court will view the evidence in the light most favourable to their defence.
These are sustained, often "close" readings, and although it would misdescribe the book to call it formalist in any doctrinaire sense, they tend to be immanent to the text and its performance (though much apt historical contextualization occurs, especially in the notes).
They also severely misdescribe blind-matching card tests (p.
We are less likely to misdescribe as formal cooperation with evil those cases that actually involve only appropriation of the predicted wrongdoing of another.
The UK does not have specific regulations regarding the composition of pasta but both the Food Safety Act and the Food Labelling Regulations make it clear that it is an offence to misdescribe a product, so the presence of common wheat in a pasta product must be declared on the product label.
An example of common mistakes made by the lienor is to misdescribe the property or the true record owner of the property.