misdescribe

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mis·de·scribe

 (mĭs′dĭ-skrīb′)
tr.v. mis·de·scribed, mis·de·scrib·ing, mis·de·scribes
To describe wrongly or falsely.

mis′de·scrip′tion (-skrĭp′shən) n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

misdescribe

(ˌmɪsdɪˈskraɪb)
vb (tr)
to provide false or misleading information about (a product, service, etc)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
"Science" itself misdescribes it, in my opinion, very badly, and therefore, when we bring in "science," we usually don't bring in science; we bring the misdescription of science itself.
A mark is considered deceptively misdescriptive if: (1) the mark misdescribes a quality, feature, function or characteristic of the services with which it is used; and (2) consumers would be likely to believe the misrepresentation.
31); misdescribes Rand as disagreeing with those who "supported private charity undertaken voluntarily" (p.
Later, John Keay admits that Pliny uses the name "caryophyllon" but so thoroughly misdescribes them as a big grain, like pepper, that he probably never saw a clove (76).
She confuses her Washington think tank publications, for example; she describes the Justice Department's Office of Legal Counsel as containing "many" political appointees; she wrongly describes the law of domestic intelligence collection; she misquotes the Convention Against Torture and misdescribes the requirements of the Geneva Conventions.
He misdescribes the car's colour and says he saw something "resembling" a mobile phone.
The article argues that the view that colors are mind-dependent dispositions misdescribes our ordinary thought about color, and fails to account for the relation that our thought about color bears to our thought about the mind-independent existence of material substance.
The fundamental "insight" of the shareholder-centric position simply misdescribes legal and economic reality.
[and] subtly misdescribes the nature of victory" (p.
Assimilating religious liberty to a general right to choose one's own values misdescribes the nature of religious conviction ...
Beidelman want to abandon "trickster" as a global term (176): ethnocentric anthropology misdescribes the disorder and ambiguity of trickster stories as deviancy and subversion rather than as the central moral concern of those stories (189).