misdiagnosis

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mis·di·ag·no·sis

 (mĭs-dī′əg-nō′sĭs)
n. pl. mis·di·ag·no·ses (-sēz)
An incorrect diagnosis.

misdiagnosis

(ˌmɪsdaɪəɡˈnəʊsɪs)
n, pl -ses (-siːz)
1. the act or an instance of misdiagnosing or being misdiagnosed
2. (Medicine) the act or an instance of misdiagnosing or being misdiagnosed

mis•di•ag•no•sis

(ˌmɪs daɪ əgˈnoʊ sɪs)

n., pl. -ses (-siz)
n.
an incorrect diagnosis.
[1945–50]
Translations

misdiagnosis

n pl <misdiagnoses>
(Med: of illness) → Fehldiagnose f, → falsche Diagnose f
(= wrong analysis: of problem, situation) → Fehleinschätzung f

mis·di·ag·no·sis

n. diagnóstico equivocado o erróneo.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Sexton misdiagnoses a patient, but it does not reveal the extent of this.
Far too many people -- whether patients, policy makers, or doctors themselves -- still aren't aware of how often misdiagnoses occur, and how easy it is for anyone to get the wrong opinion.
Misdiagnosing patients cost almost $39 billion in malpractice claims over the past quarter-century, according to a study in BMJ Quality & Safety Misdiagnoses represent more than 28% of total paid malpractice claims and more than 35% of malpractice claim payouts, the study found.
The briefing document does not reveal the circumstances of the misdiagnoses revealed to date.
In up to 10 percent of cases, nonforensic autopsies uncover major misdiagnoses, the kind that can hasten the end.
An independent investigation recently linked the Finnish medic to 15 cancer misdiagnoses at Cork University Hospital in July and August this year.
Nonetheless, the questions remain, why is the number of misdiagnoses so high, and what can be done about it?
There's an epidemic of misdiagnoses today: that's the contention of sally M.
THOUSANDS of people could be taking unnecessary blood pressure drugs all their lives because of doctors' misdiagnoses, according to a study out today.
Detection rates varied by specialty, with misdiagnoses for 61% of patients who saw primary care physicians, 49% who saw psychologists / counselors, and 44% who saw psychiatrists.
Confusion over how to interpret assay or immunoblot results accurately seems to have led to misdiagnoses.