miser


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

mi·ser

 (mī′zər)
n.
1. One who lives very meagerly in order to hoard money.
2. A greedy or avaricious person.

[From Latin, wretched.]

miser

(ˈmaɪzə)
n
1. a person who hoards money or possessions, often living miserably
2. selfish person
[C16: from Latin: wretched]

miser

(ˈmaɪzə)
n
(Civil Engineering) civil engineering a large hand-operated auger used for loose soils
[C19: origin unknown]

mi•ser

(ˈmaɪ zər)

n.
1. a person who lives poorly in order to save money.
2. a stingy, avaricious person.
[1550–60; < Latin: wretched]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.miser - a stingy hoarder of money and possessions (often living miserably)miser - a stingy hoarder of money and possessions (often living miserably)
cheapskate, tightwad - a miserly person
hoarder - a person who accumulates things and hides them away for future use

miser

noun hoarder, Scrooge, penny-pincher (informal), curmudgeon, skinflint, screw (slang), cheapskate (informal), tight-arse (taboo slang), tightwad (U.S. & Canad. slang), churl (archaic), tight-ass (U.S. taboo slang), niggard I'm married to a miser.

miser

noun
A stingy person:
Informal: penny pincher.
Translations
بَخيلبَخِيلٌ
lakomec
gnier
saituri
škrtac
nirfill, nánös
どけち
구두쇠
niekingai menkasšykštumasšykštuolis
sīkstulis
lakomec
skopuh
snåljåp
คนตระหนี่
cimri kimsepinti
người keo kiệt

miser

[ˈmaɪzəʳ] Navaro/a m/f

miser

[ˈmaɪzər] navare m/f

miser

nGeizhals m, → Geizkragen m

miser

[ˈmɑɪzəʳ] navaro/a

miser

(ˈmaizə) noun
a mean person who lives very poorly in order to store up wealth. That old miser won't give you a cent!
ˈmiserly adjective
ˈmiserliness noun

miser

بَخِيلٌ lakomec gnier Geizhals φιλάργυρος avaro saituri avare škrtac avaro どけち 구두쇠 vrek gjerrigknark skąpiec avarento скряга snåljåp คนตระหนี่ pinti người keo kiệt 吝啬鬼
References in classic literature ?
At last it came into the man's head that he would not go on thus without pay any longer; so he went to his master, and said, 'I have worked hard for you a long time, I will trust to you to give me what I deserve to have for my trouble.' The farmer was a sad miser, and knew that his man was very simple-hearted; so he took out threepence, and gave him for every year's service a penny.
Once upon a time there was a Miser who used to hide his gold at the foot of a tree in his garden; but every week he used to go and dig it up and gloat over his gains.
Now, look well about you, my dear, and tell me if you see any book about a Miser.'
Altogether, the operation on the miser's mind was a task that Godfrey would be sure to hand over to his more daring and cunning brother: Dunstan had made up his mind to that; and by the time he saw the light gleaming through the chinks of Marner's shutters, the idea of a dialogue with the weaver had become so familiar to him, that it occurred to him as quite a natural thing to make the acquaintance forthwith.
Oliver thought the old gentleman must be a decided miser to live in such a dirty place, with so many watches; but, thinking that perhaps his fondness for the Dodger and the other boys, cost him a good deal of money, he only cast a deferential look at the Jew, and asked if he might get up.
Nay, Seneca adds niceness and satiety: Cogita quamdiu eadem feceris; mori velle, non tantum fortis aut miser, sed etiam fastidiosus potest.
It was quite evident from his very mannerism that Thurid had keenly guessed the man's weakness--even the clawlike, clutching movement of the fingers betokened the avariciousness of the miser.
Never did money diggers turn up a miser's hoard with more eager delight, than did the savages lay open the treasures of the caches.
I do not know why my delight in those tragedies did not send me to the volume of his plays, which was all the time in the bookcase at home, but I seem not to have thought of it, and rapt as I was in them I am not sure that they gave me greater pleasure, or seemed at all finer, than "Rollo," "The Wife," "The Stranger," "Barbarossa," "The Miser of Marseilles," and the rest of the melodramas, comedies, and farces which I saw at that time.
No one has ever considered me a miser since, while my carelessness of money is a source of anxiety and worry to some that know me.
The cobbler wrought upon a shoe; the blacksmith hammered his iron, the soldier waved his glittering blade; the lady raised a tiny breeze with her fan; the jolly toper swigged lustily at his bottle; a scholar opened his book with eager thirst for knowledge, and turned his head to and fro along the page; the milkmaid energetically drained her cow; and a miser counted gold into his strong-box,--all at the same turning of a crank.
That which made you act was heart alone -- the noble and good heart which you possess beneath your apparent skepticism and sarcastic irony; you have engaged the fortune of a servitor, and your own, I suspect, my benevolent miser! and your sacrifice is not acknowledged!