miserabilism

(redirected from miserablism)

miserabilism

(ˈmɪzərəbɪlˌɪzəm; ˈmɪzrə-) or

miserablism

n
the quality of seeming to enjoy being depressed, or the type of gloomy music, art, etc, that evokes this
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

miserabilism

the philosophy of pessimism.
See also: Philosophy
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Truthfully, the mood of midlife miserablism grates somewhat, as Renton (Ewan McGrgeor) and the gang are reunited in Scotland.
In an interview with the Sunday Telegraph, Mr Johnson accused Theresa May of presiding over a "diet of miserablism" and a "computer says no" approach in government.
Of course, there's another good reason why Rateliff is not the sort of chap to indulge in 'woe is me' miserablism. A man with a big heart and a big social conscience, Rateliff has recently set up a foundation, The Marigold Project, designed to help the homeless and disadvantaged in his native Denver.
"Mimicry, Miserablism, and Management Education," Journal of Management Inquiry 23(4): 439-442.
He writes: "The message of miserablism rings loud and clear from the mouths of nationalists of all kinds, Ukip and Plaid together.
Can we hope that we lose the mindless, numb, 'miserablism' that surrounds any mention of development such as new industry or energy proposals?
There I go again, sounding like a Scottish Miserablist, which is doubly ironic given that part of my contribution to the referendum debate was to co-author a book with David Manderson, The Glass Half Full--Moving Beyond Scottish Miserablism, for Luath's Open Scotland series.
To challenge and provoke viewers does not, happily, preclude entertaining them; nor does it necessarily mean trafficking in miserablism while denying us the narrative satisfactions of emotion, humor, coherence and relatability.
Perhaps the root of the left's problems is really miserablism instead.
On the subject of Europe, he is deeply and justifiably melancholy: the common currency is a huge problem; regionalization is bound to fail and cause misery as it does so; and while there is not much of a European future, there's a fairly rich and compensating past in the face of which "miserablism" is a foolish creed.
This miserablism leads to a mixture of indifference toward the past and hatred of it.