misery


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mis·er·y

 (mĭz′ə-rē)
n. pl. mis·er·ies
1.
a. The state of suffering and want as a result of physical circumstances or extreme poverty.
b. Mental or emotional unhappiness or distress: "Our happiness or misery depends on our dispositions, and not on our circumstances" (Martha Washington).
2. A cause or source of suffering: the miseries of adolescence.
3. Informal A physical ache or ailment.

[Middle English miserie, from Old French, from Latin miseria, from miser, wretched.]

misery

(ˈmɪzərɪ)
n, pl -eries
1. intense unhappiness, discomfort, or suffering; wretchedness
2. a cause of such unhappiness, discomfort, etc
3. squalid or poverty-stricken conditions
4. informal Brit a person who is habitually depressed: he is such a misery.
5. dialect a pain or ailment
[C14: via Anglo-Norman from Latin miseria, from miser wretched]

mis•er•y

(ˈmɪz ə ri)

n., pl. -er•ies.
1. wretchedness of condition or circumstances.
2. suffering caused by privation or poverty.
3. great mental or emotional distress; extreme unhappiness.
4. a source of distress.
[1325–75; < Latin miseria=miser wretched + -ia -y3]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.misery - a state of ill-being due to affliction or misfortunemisery - a state of ill-being due to affliction or misfortune; "the misery and wretchedness of those slums is intolerable"
ill-being - lack of prosperity or happiness or health
concentration camp - a situation characterized by crowding and extremely harsh conditions
living death - a state of constant misery
woe, suffering - misery resulting from affliction
2.misery - a feeling of intense unhappinessmisery - a feeling of intense unhappiness; "she was exhausted by her misery and grief"
sadness, unhappiness - emotions experienced when not in a state of well-being

misery

noun
2. poverty, want, need, squalor, privation, penury, destitution, wretchedness, sordidness, indigence An elite profited from the misery of the poor.
poverty luxury
3. (Brit. informal) moaner, pessimist, killjoy, spoilsport, grouch (informal), prophet of doom, wet blanket (informal), sourpuss (informal), wowser (Austral. & N.Z. slang) I'm not such a misery now. I've got things sorted out a bit.
4. misfortune, trouble, trial, disaster, load, burden, curse, ordeal, hardship, catastrophe, sorrow, woe, calamity, affliction, tribulation, bitter pill (informal) There is no point dwelling on the miseries of the past.

misery

noun
1. A state of prolonged anguish and privation:
2. A state of physical or mental suffering:
3. Informal. A sensation of physical discomfort occurring as the result of disease or injury:
Translations
بُؤسٌبُؤْس، شَقاء، تَعاسَه
bídaneštěstísklíčenosttrápeníutrpení
elendighed
kurjuus
bijedajad
eymd
惨めさ
비참
bēdasposts
beda
elände
ความทุกข์ยาก
mutsuzluksefalet
sự khốn khổ

misery

[ˈmɪzərɪ] N
1. (= sadness) → tristeza f, pena f
2. (= poverty) → miseria f, pobreza f
to live in miseryvivir en la miseria
3. (= misfortune) → desgracia f
a life of miseryuna vida desgraciada
4. (= suffering) → sufrimiento m, dolor m
to put an animal out of its miseryrematar a un animal (para que no sufra)
to put sb out of his/her misery (fig) → sacar a algn de la incertidumbre
to make sb's life a miseryamargar la vida a algn
5. (Brit) (= person) → aguafiestas mf inv

misery

[ˈmɪzəri] n
(= unhappiness) → misère f
All that money brought nothing but misery → Tout cet argent n'a apporté que de la misère.
to make sb's life a misery → rendre la vie de qn impossible
(= pain) → souffrances fpl
to put sb out of their misery (= satisfy curiosity) → mettre fin au supplice de qn
to put an animal out of its misery → achever un animal
(= wretchedness) → misère f
to be a misery [person] → être un or une rabat-joie
She's a real misery → C'est une vraie rabat-joie.misery guts nrabat-joie m inv or f inv

misery

n
(= sadness)Kummer m, → Trauer f; she looked the picture of miserysie war ein Bild des Jammers
(= suffering)Qualen pl; (= wretchedness)Elend nt; the misery caused by wardas Elend des Krieges; a life of miseryein erbärmliches or jämmerliches or elendes Leben; to make somebody’s life a miseryjdm das Leben zur Qual or zur Hölle machen; to put an animal out of its miseryein Tier von seinen Qualen erlösen; to put somebody out of his misery (fig)jdn nicht länger auf die Folter spannen
(Brit inf: = person) → Miesepeter m (inf)

misery

[ˈmɪzərɪ] n (unhappiness) → tristezza; (pain) → sofferenza, tormento, dolore m; (wretchedness) → miseria (fam) (person) → lagna
to put an animal out of its misery → uccidere un animale (per non farlo soffrire più)
to put sb out of his misery (fig) → mettere fine alle sofferenze di qn
to make sb's life a misery → rovinare la vita a qn

misery

(ˈmizəri) plural ˈmiseries noun
(something that causes) unhappiness. the misery of the fatherless children; Forget your miseries and come out with me!

misery

بُؤسٌ sklíčenost elendighed Elend δυστυχία sufrimiento kurjuus misère bijeda miseria 惨めさ 비참 ellende elendighet niedola miséria несчастье elände ความทุกข์ยาก sefalet sự khốn khổ 痛苦

misery

n. sufrimiento, pena; desesperación; miseria.

misery

n miseria
References in classic literature ?
For, dear Hetty, if I were to do what you one day spoke of, and make you my wife, I should do what you yourself would come to feel was for your misery instead of your welfare.
It seemed to me that I was hurried on by an inevitable and unseen fate to this day of misery, and that now I was to expiate all my offences at the gallows; that I was now to give satisfaction to justice with my blood, and that I was come to the last hour of my life and of my wickedness together.
He seemed extremely unhappy; but when she took his arm and walked away with him, seeking a retired corner, a ray of hope mingled with the almost comical misery of his expression.
I said in one of my letters, my dear Margaret, that I should find no friend on the wide ocean; yet I have found a man who, before his spirit had been broken by misery, I should have been happy to have possessed as the brother of my heart.
Indeed, sir, there never was any misery like theirs.
If it had been Tertius who stood opposite to her, that look of misery would have been a pang to him, and he would have sunk by her side to comfort her, with that strong-armed comfort which, she had often held very cheap.
I want to say that we can't go on like this; that this is misery.
Twenty years ago, that pavement was worn with the footsteps of a mother and child, who, day by day, so surely as the morning came, presented themselves at the prison gate; often after a night of restless misery and anxious thoughts, were they there, a full hour too soon, and then the young mother turning meekly away, would lead the child to the old bridge, and raising him in her arms to show him the glistening water, tinted with the light of the morning's sun, and stirring with all the bustling preparations for business and pleasure that the river presented at that early hour, endeavour to interest his thoughts in the objects before him.
Rising, he kicked the cat out of the door, and picking up the mouse compassionately put it out of its misery by pulling off its head.
And she was so pitiless that she took poor Rapunzel into a desert where she had to live in great grief and misery.
The horror of a mind like Fanny's, as it received the conviction of such guilt, and began to take in some part of the misery that must ensue, can hardly be described.
As her eyes rested upon them an expression of misery and horror overspread her countenance.