misgrowth

misgrowth

(ˌmɪsˈɡrəʊθ)
n
an abnormal or distorted growth
References in periodicals archive ?
China%s economy has experienced remarkable growth over the past several decades, but misgrowth has been accompanied by an increase in social and environmental challenges.
For Coleridge this potentially global audience is an inevitable excrescence of the traffic in books--what in the Statesman's Manual he had called "the misgrowth of our luxuriant activity." (39) The "manufacturing" and migration of books, in turn, comprise a circulatory system, at once autonomous and unstoppably automatic, which Coleridge, like the United Irishmen before him, figures as the turning of "a barrel organ," a machine that simultaneously produces and distributes sound (38-39).
Behind this lay a further failure to anchor itself in the specifically Scottish tradition of anti-Catholicism and appear anything other than a misgrowth and "unwelcome import." (3) Of course, Orangeism's failure to develop a more respectable reputation does not mean that it did not make a significant impact on Scottish society.