misjudgment


Also found in: Thesaurus.

mis·judge

 (mĭs-jŭj′)
v. mis·judged, mis·judg·ing, mis·judg·es
v.tr.
To judge wrongly.
v.intr.
To be wrong in judging.

mis·judg′ment n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:

misjudgment

noun
Translations

misjudgment

[ˌmɪsˈdʒʌdʒmənt] misjudgement (British) nerreur f de jugement
Many accidents were due to pilot misjudgement → De nombreux accidents étaient dus à une erreur de jugement du pilote.
References in classic literature ?
Every part of it brought pain and humiliation, of some sort or other; but, compared with the evil to Harriet, all was light; and she would gladly have submitted to feel yet more mistaken more in errormore disgraced by misjudgment, than she actually was, could the effects of her blunders have been confined to herself.
Cadwallader; and Sir James felt with some sadness that she was to have perfect liberty of misjudgment. It was a sign of his good disposition that he did not slacken at all in his intention of carrying out Dorothea's design of the cottages.
The latter was not to be censured for his misjudgment. All his life he had tended and operated on the soft humans of civilisation, who lived sheltered lives and had descended out of many sheltered generations.
Cllr Peter Brennan is standing down as the city councillor for Old Swan after what he said was a "calamitous misjudgment".
A FATHER-of-two died in front of his best friend in a routine skydiving training exercise after making a fatal misjudgment, his father has said.
FORMER Prime Minister Sir John Major told South Shields the "biggest single misjudgment" of his Government was how it handled the demise of coal.
This stems from a misjudgment by Palace advisers, who should have helped Thomas cope way before the wedding.
Police posted a photo of the First bus with the observation that the driver had made a "slight misjudgment" over the size of the vehicle.
Heisler further added that as people approach mid-life these cells slow down and become lazier in sending these signals, which leads to a misjudgment of how much food their body needs.
After realizing its misjudgment, the pub welcomed the priests and have since renamed one of its beers the Thirsty Priests, with the tagline "saving souls and satisfying thirsts."
The result of this Blair misjudgment resulted in an open door for many criminals from these eastern countries.
The result of this Blair misjudgment resulted in an open door for many criminals from these eastern European countries, many having been convicted of murder and some subsequently re-offending here and being sentenced to a life imprisonment tariff for murder in the UK.