mislike

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mis·like

 (mĭs-līk′)
tr.v. mis·liked, mis·lik·ing, mis·likes
1. To disapprove of; dislike.
2. Archaic To displease.
n.
Disapproval; dislike.

[Middle English misliken, from Old English mislīcian : mis-, ill; see mis-1 + līcian, to please; see like1.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

mislike

(mɪsˈlaɪk)
vb (tr)
to dislike
n
dislike or aversion
misˈliker n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

mislike


Past participle: misliked
Gerund: misliking

Imperative
mislike
mislike
Present
I mislike
you mislike
he/she/it mislikes
we mislike
you mislike
they mislike
Preterite
I misliked
you misliked
he/she/it misliked
we misliked
you misliked
they misliked
Present Continuous
I am misliking
you are misliking
he/she/it is misliking
we are misliking
you are misliking
they are misliking
Present Perfect
I have misliked
you have misliked
he/she/it has misliked
we have misliked
you have misliked
they have misliked
Past Continuous
I was misliking
you were misliking
he/she/it was misliking
we were misliking
you were misliking
they were misliking
Past Perfect
I had misliked
you had misliked
he/she/it had misliked
we had misliked
you had misliked
they had misliked
Future
I will mislike
you will mislike
he/she/it will mislike
we will mislike
you will mislike
they will mislike
Future Perfect
I will have misliked
you will have misliked
he/she/it will have misliked
we will have misliked
you will have misliked
they will have misliked
Future Continuous
I will be misliking
you will be misliking
he/she/it will be misliking
we will be misliking
you will be misliking
they will be misliking
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been misliking
you have been misliking
he/she/it has been misliking
we have been misliking
you have been misliking
they have been misliking
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been misliking
you will have been misliking
he/she/it will have been misliking
we will have been misliking
you will have been misliking
they will have been misliking
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been misliking
you had been misliking
he/she/it had been misliking
we had been misliking
you had been misliking
they had been misliking
Conditional
I would mislike
you would mislike
he/she/it would mislike
we would mislike
you would mislike
they would mislike
Past Conditional
I would have misliked
you would have misliked
he/she/it would have misliked
we would have misliked
you would have misliked
they would have misliked
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:

mislike

verb
To have a feeling of aversion for:
Archaic: distaste.
noun
An attitude or feeling of aversion:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
He misliked the very word "interesting," connoting it with wasted energy and even with morbidity.
by profession I am a scholler, & in wil do affect that which I could neuer effect in action, for faine would I haue some taste in the liberall sciences, but Non licet cuibis adire Corinthum, and therefore I content my selfe with a superficiall insight, and only satisfie my desire with the name of a Scholler, yet as blinde Baiard wil iumpe soonest into the mire, so haue I ventured afore many my betters, to put my selfe into the presse, and haue set foorth sundrie bookes in print of loue & such amourous fancies which some haue fauoured, as other haue misliked ([C2.sup.r]).
Sidney theorizes tragedy as an emulative mode: "if evil men come to the stage, they ever go out (as the tragedy writer answered to one that misliked the show of such persons) so manacled, as they little animate folks to follow them." Titus, Hamlet, Cicero, Domitian--these characters, which Dickson shows are routinely presented in relation to precedent, go out in a manner unlikely to animate folks to follow them.
"Other names of government are but these same forms misliked. They that are discontented under monarchy call it tyranny; and they that are displeased with aristocracy call it oligarchy: they which find themselves grieved under a democracy call it anarchy." (85) These names simply stand for distinctly private preferences or, in the age of Facebook, "likes" or "dislikes." They do not rest on the basis of a well-founded political argument that allows us to say that X (say, George III) "really is" a tyrant rather than merely someone not sufficiently liked by American colonists.