missee

missee

(ˌmɪsˈsiː)
vb (tr) , -sees, -seeing, -saw or -seen
to see wronglyto take a wrong view of
References in periodicals archive ?
Linda Missee, another survivor, confirmed that the bus was overloaded and was being driven at high speed.
Narrating the ordeal, Missee, 28, said she was lucky to have survived the accident.
The couple spent last winter in Inverness but recently moored their boat, Missee, at Applecross Street, near the centre of Glasgow.
e." The couple have most recently moored their boat "Missee" at Applecross Street, near the centre of Glasgow.
(76) Here, Othello speaks deferentially and stereotypically to "Good Massa Lieutenant," "Massa Duke," "Massa Iago," "Desdemony," and "Missee O." As in Mathews's play, Othello also speaks in close parodies of famous lines, such as, "Him nebber more be officer of mine" (24), "Him hear you say just now, 'me no like dat!' (28), "No, Massa, Iago, him prove before him doubt" (29), "Villain!
(89.) Missee D, Esteve PO, Renneboog B, Vidal M, Cerutti M, St Pierre Y, et al.
The Bulletin and other publications mocked the pidgin English used by the Chinese, with their use of 'ee' on the ends of nouns, like 'cabbagee' and 'Missee'; their mispronunciation of letters like 'r' and 'l'; and their back-to-front grammar.
Ransome's many other works include Swallows and Amazons (1931), Pigeon Post (1936), We Didn't Mean to Go to Sea (1937), Missee Lee (1941), and Mainly About Fishing (1959).