missileer


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missileer

(ˌmɪsaɪˈlɪə)
n
(Firearms, Gunnery, Ordnance & Artillery) a serviceman or servicewoman who is responsible for firing missiles
References in periodicals archive ?
Steve Pomeroy, a history professor and former missileer himself, delves into one of least known areas of America's nuclear weapons history as he explores the Air Force's efforts to mobilize its ICBMs.
Under Rands leadership, AFGSC saw the implementation of career-changes to the 13N, or missileer, career field, as well as force structure changes to AFGSC security forces.
While his fighter-jock dream was gone, he still wanted to serve his country and accepted a two-year scholarship from Strategic Air Command to serve his four years as a nuclear missileer.
Steve Pomeroy, a history professor and former missileer himself, delves into one of the least known areas of America's nuclear weapons history as he explores the Air Force's efforts to mobilize its ICBMs.
'We get some people that have no idea that there's even an Air Force base here," one active-duty missileer told me.
In 1999, Becket lawyers mediated an employment dispute between the Air Force and Lieutenant Ryan Berry, a Catholic nuclear missileer who was reprimanded by his commanding officer because he refused to share an underground silo with a female colleague on the grounds that such close quarters would "occasion sin." The following year, Becket filed an amicus brief in Boy Scouts of America v.
"When the order comes to turn the key, I won't even spare a thought, I will carry it out at once." So says the scarily calm new missileer, 22-year-old lieutenant Evgeny Pavlov.
There's something called a Personnel Reliability Programme that requires every missileer to report any fellow officer's problems, emotional, medical, financial.
Brandon Bush, a nuclear launch control officer (missileer).
An ex-military source suggests that "a single canny [American] missileer could, for whatever reason, launch fifty missiles on his own." As always, Rosenbaum writes colorfully about his unnerving research, which includes a visit to the "Strangelovian Old Curiosity Shop" that is the National Security Archives and meeting a black-humored Russian bomb designer.
Each missileer has his or her own workstation with a computer monitor that displays lines of text with incredibly basic characters, almost like an MS-DOS computer.
Third, I was a missileer, a trigger puller in a job with little tolerance for error.