mistrial

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mis·tri·al

 (mĭs′trī′əl, -trīl′, mĭs-trī′əl, -trīl′)
n.
A trial that is rendered void and of no legal effect because of some serious procedural error or irregularity or because of the inability of the jury to reach a verdict.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

mistrial

(mɪsˈtraɪəl)
n
1. (Law) a trial made void because of some error, such as a defect in procedure
2. (Law) (in the US) an inconclusive trial, as when a jury cannot agree on a verdict
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

mis•tri•al

(mɪsˈtraɪ əl, -ˈtraɪl)

n.
1. a trial terminated without conclusion on the merits of the case because of some prejudicial error in the proceedings.
2. an inconclusive trial, as where the jury cannot agree on a verdict.
[1620–30]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

mistrial

A trial that is invalid because an error has been made or because the jury is unable to agree on a verdict.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mistrial - a trial that is invalid or inconclusivemistrial - a trial that is invalid or inconclusive
trial - (law) the determination of a person's innocence or guilt by due process of law; "he had a fair trial and the jury found him guilty"; "most of these complaints are settled before they go to trial"
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

mistrial

[ˌmɪsˈtraɪəl] N (US, Brit) (invalidated) → juicio m viciado de nulidad (US) (inconclusive) → juicio m nulo por desacuerdo del jurado
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

mistrial

[ˈmɪstraɪəl] n
(= trial that is conducted unfairly) → annulation f du procès
(US) (= trial ending without a verdict) → annulation f du procès
to declare a mistrial → prononcer l'annulation du procès
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

mistrial

n it was declared a mistrialdas Urteil wurde wegen Verfahrensmängeln aufgehoben
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
The special appellate bench of Supreme Court of Pakistan has overturned 85 percent of death sentences on the basis of flawed investigations and mistrials reducing the death row population significantly.
Intellectual Ventures Chief Litigation Counsel Melissa Pinocchio said in a statement, "Mistrials are an occasional fact of life, and it is disappointing (for us, and probably also for Motorola) that the jury could not reach a unanimous verdict.
Trials in progress would now have to be declared mistrials and defendants free to walk.
Alan Ruff has had two mistrials and three hung juries and was even convicted of killing his ex-girlfriend after the last trial in 2007.
In the article, As Jurors Turn to Google and Twitter, Mistrials Are Popping Up, John Schwartz reported about a federal drug trial in Florida where nine jurors had used the Internet to research information about the case.
The first two trials ended in mistrials when jurors could not agree on the men's guilt or innocence.
Mistrials because of hung juries are relatively rare.
"This one drained the life from me." Two previous juries in the last year wound up deadlocked, with resulting mistrials, after Gotti's lawyers argued the second-generation Mafiosi had years ago severed his ties to organised crime.
She presided over his two previous racketeering trials, which were ruled mistrials after the juries failed to reach verdicts.
Part III then turns to the flip side of the coin--cases that have ended in mistrials--and considers whether mistrials have been major government setbacks.
United States(4) established the only existing exception to Ball when it forbade retrial after the reversal of a conviction on grounds of insufficient evidence.(5) But the Supreme Court also has recognized, albeit in the context of mistrials, that particularly egregious prosecutorial misconduct can and should trigger the protections of the Double Jeopardy Clause.