miswanting


Also found in: Medical.

miswanting

wanting something you mistakenly think will give you pleasure or be fulfilling
References in periodicals archive ?
(164.) Gilbert and Wilson call this phenomenon "miswanting." Gilbert & Wilson, supra note 12, at 551.
Like Fuentes's Consuelo, the narrative voice of Antes cannot exist without the childhood that gave "death" to her, and yet because the narrator exists as a product of that social demise, she has nowhere to go but to the past, which strikes this remembering self as unpleasant and yet "all there is." The remembering seifs discriminatory process of memory-making produces "miswanting," a term that the social scientists prefer to the term "irrational" since it sounds less mentally unbalanced (Kahneman 406).
In order to explain how the remembering self might have slipped into the same dream of experience that kept the protagonist from completely processing the lessons, this passage can be read to imply that the remembering narrator accepts an "inauthentic" dream state, characterized by the inability to decipher authentic desire from miswanting, and cannot jar herself out of this intellectual habit.
In the cultural sphere, Diane Negra has termed such tales of affluent women setting aside career ambitions to return to their hometowns or otherwise take up fulfilled domestic lives "retreatist narratives." Contemporary films, particularly romantic comedies, can be read as dramas of "'miswanting' in which the heroine comes to realize that her professional aspirations are misplaced" (95).
(20) Additionally, people often want things that, when they get them, they do not actually want or like; such "miswanting" is problematic not only in legal negotiation but in any client-driven process (such as software development, for example).
(47) Finally, borrowers are prone to "miswanting" and will often make purchases that do not promote their welfare (e.g., a new pair of designer shoes) while failing to purchase items that promote their welfare (e.g., groceries).
"Miswanting: Some Problems in the Forecasting of Future Affective States." Chapter in Thinking and Feeling: The Role of Affect in Social Cognition.
Adaptive Preferences and "Miswanting." The first objection emphasizes the possibility that people's preferences have adapted to existing opportunities, including deprivation.
Wilson, "Miswanting: Some Problems in the Forecasting of Future Affective States," in Feeling and Thinking: The Role of Affect in Social Cognition, ed.
Self-control, Miswanting, and Cumulative Cost Neglect III.