respiration

(redirected from mitochondrial respiration)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia.
Related to mitochondrial respiration: cellular respiration, Cell respiration

res·pi·ra·tion

 (rĕs′pə-rā′shən)
n.
1.
a. The action or process of inhaling and exhaling; breathing. Also called ventilation.
b. An act of inhaling and exhaling; a breath.
2. The action or process by which an organism without lungs, such as a fish or plant, exchanges gases with its environment.
3.
a. The oxidative process occurring within living cells by which the chemical energy of organic molecules is converted in a series of metabolic steps into usable energy in the form of ATP, involving the consumption of oxygen and the production of carbon dioxide and water as byproducts.
b. Any of various analogous metabolic processes by which certain organisms, such as anaerobic bacteria and some fungi, obtain energy from organic molecules without consuming oxygen.

res′pi·ra′tion·al adj.

respiration

(ˌrɛspəˈreɪʃən)
n
1. (Biology) the process in living organisms of taking in oxygen from the surroundings and giving out carbon dioxide (external respiration). In terrestrial animals this is effected by breathing air
2. (Biology) the chemical breakdown of complex organic substances, such as carbohydrates and fats, that takes place in the cells and tissues of animals and plants, during which energy is released and carbon dioxide produced (internal respiration)

res•pi•ra•tion

(ˌrɛs pəˈreɪ ʃən)

n.
1. the act of respiring; inhalation and exhalation of air; breathing.
2.
a. the sum total of the physical and chemical processes by which oxygen is conveyed to tissues and cells and the oxidation products, carbon dioxide and water, are given off.
b. the oxidation of organic compounds occurring within cells and producing energy for cellular processes.
res`pi•ra′tion•al, adj.

res·pi·ra·tion

(rĕs′pə-rā′shən)
The process by which organisms exchange gases, especially oxygen and carbon dioxide, with the environment. In air-breathing vertebrates, respiration takes place in the lungs. In fish and many invertebrates, respiration takes place through the gills. Respiration in green plants occurs during photosynthesis. See cellular respiration.

respiration

1. Chemical reactions inside a cell that break down food molecules to release energy.
2. A term with several different meanings: (1) breathing; (2) taking up oxygen and giving out carbon dioxide; (3) deriving energy from food with or without oxygen. See aerobic respiration, anaerobic respiration.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.respiration - the metabolic processes whereby certain organisms obtain energy from organic moleculesrespiration - the metabolic processes whereby certain organisms obtain energy from organic molecules; processes that take place in the cells and tissues during which energy is released and carbon dioxide is produced and absorbed by the blood to be transported to the lungs
metabolic process, metabolism - the organic processes (in a cell or organism) that are necessary for life
2.respiration - a single complete act of breathing in and out; "thirty respirations per minute"
bodily function, bodily process, body process, activity - an organic process that takes place in the body; "respiratory activity"
3.respiration - the bodily process of inhalation and exhalationrespiration - the bodily process of inhalation and exhalation; the process of taking in oxygen from inhaled air and releasing carbon dioxide by exhalation
artificial respiration - an emergency procedure whereby breathing is maintained artificially
abdominal breathing - breathing in which most of the respiratory effort is done by the abdominal muscles; "abdominal breathing is practiced by singers"
eupnea, eupnoea - normal relaxed breathing
hyperpnea - energetic (deep and rapid) respiration that occurs normally after exercise or abnormally with fever or various disorders
hypopnea - slow or shallow breathing
hyperventilation - an increased depth and rate of breathing greater than demanded by the body needs; can cause dizziness and tingling of the fingers and toes and chest pain if continued
panting, heaving - breathing heavily (as after exertion)
Cheyne-Stokes respiration, periodic breathing - abnormal respiration in which periods of shallow and deep breathing alternate
smoking, smoke - the act of smoking tobacco or other substances; "he went outside for a smoke"; "smoking stinks"
breathing out, exhalation, expiration - the act of expelling air from the lungs
snoring, stertor, snore - the act of snoring or producing a snoring sound
sniffle, snuffle, snivel - the act of breathing heavily through the nose (as when the nose is congested)
wheeze - breathing with a husky or whistling sound
second wind - the return of relatively easy breathing after initial exhaustion during continuous exertion
breathing in, inhalation, intake, aspiration, inspiration - the act of inhaling; the drawing in of air (or other gases) as in breathing
bodily function, bodily process, body process, activity - an organic process that takes place in the body; "respiratory activity"

respiration

noun
The act or process of breathing:
Translations
تَنَفُّس
dechdýchání
ånding
hengitys
lélegzés
öndun
andningrespiration

respiration

[ˌrespɪˈreɪʃən] Nrespiración f

respiration

[ˌrɛspɪˈreɪʃən] nrespiration f

respiration

n (Bot, Med) → Atmung f

respiration

[ˌrɛspɪˈreɪʃn] nrespirazione f

respire

(rəˈspaiə) verb
to breathe.
respiration (respəˈreiʃən) noun
breathing.
respirator (ˈrespə) noun
1. a sort of mask worn to purify the air breathed in eg by firemen.
2. a piece of apparatus used to help very ill or injured people to breathe.
respiratory (ˈrespərətəri) adjective
related to breathing. respiratory diseases.

res·pi·ra·tion

n. respiración, proceso respiratorio;
abdominal ______ abdominal;
aerobic ______ aeróbica;
accelerated ______ acelerada;
anaerobic ______ anaeróbica;
diaphragmatic ______ diafragmática;
air hunger, gasping ______ jadeante;
labored ______ laboriosa.

respiration

n respiración f
References in periodicals archive ?
Accumulating evidence shows that mitochondrial respiration (cellular breathing) is a key switch that drives muscle stem cells to differentiate, an energy-intensive process, instead of self-renew.
Our results suggest a potential regulatory loop between PRODH/POX and succinate in regulation of mitochondrial respiration. (30) Mitochondrial Effectors
Cytochrome aa3 depletion is the cause of the deficient mitochondrial respiration induced by chronic valproate administration.
Thus, the present study aimed at investigating and comparing the effects of RSH and SIH on sea level running and cycling performance, and to elucidate potential common or divergent adaptations of muscle perfusion and oxygenation as well as mitochondrial respiration of blood cells, possibly related to performance improvements.
Deficiency in the mitochondrial kinase PINK1 is associated with inhibition of mitochondrial respiration due to limitation of mitochondrial substrates, leading to a decrease in the mitochondrial membrane potential and increased vulnerability to dopamine toxicity.
Mitochondrial oxygen consumption and respiratory control ratios for representative compounds exhibiting effects similar to uncouplers of mitochondrial respiration. Oxygen consumption was measured using the Clark-type oxygen electrode after isolated rat liver mitochondria were incubated with various concentrations of (A and B) FCCP, (C and D) chlorfenapyr, (E and F) dinoterb, and (G and H) triclocarban.
The Agilent Seahorse XFe Analyzers simultaneously measure the two-major cellular energy-producing pathways mitochondrial respiration and glycolysisin live cells, in real time.
To do so, we analyzed the mitochondrial respiration profile after treatment with or without CoQ10.
Increased reliance on mitochondrial respiration will increase the flow of electrons through the mtETC and, in turn, increase the potential for mtROS formation.
Fiskum, "Methoxychlor inhibits brain mitochondrial respiration and increases hydrogen peroxide production and CREB phosphorylation," Toxicological Sciences, vol.
To estimate if the increase in mitochondrial respiration is due to an increase of the cellular mitochondrial content, the mtDNA copies per cell were counted.

Full browser ?