mixed-race


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Related to mixed-race: Mixed heritage, Mixed ethnicity

mixed-race

adj
(Sociology) relating to or characteristic of people of different ethnic origins
Usage: The term mixed-race may well cause offence. The people so labelled might object to being thought of as a mixture, and identify with one ethnic group. Possible alternatives when referring specifically to ethic origins are of mixed ethnicity and of mixed ethnic origin
References in periodicals archive ?
Schlund-Vials (who is a mixed-race Cambodian and white American.
The Heaton-born celeb said having mixed-race women in prominent public positions would have given her "validation" growing up.
Multiracials and Civil Rights: Mixed-Race Stories of Discrimination
The 34-year-old former Xtra Factor host said: "It's still not easy sometimes being a mixed-race woman, even in today's society, and there are certain people who still don't embrace it.
I've spent my life navigating the nuances that come with being mixed-race. On one hand, I am aware of the privilege that comes with having one White parent and European features, making it easier for me to navigate academic and social spaces.
A mixed-race American actress with a history of activism, Markle is a different mould of royal princess -- and the symbolism was not lost on the largely black crowd.
I never thought, 'Oh, look at me in a mixed-race relationship.' "I fell in love with a man and he happened to be black and we adopted a mixed-race daughter.
Lots of mixed-race couples weren't so lucky." Dawn, who lives in Cornwall with second husband Mark Bignell, is releasing a new book next week giving life advice called Me, You.
Multicultural literature for children and young adults has never been known to adequately reflect the diversity of society, so it will come as no surprise that there are very few contemporary publications or research in children's and young adult literature depicting mixed-race experiences.
Sharing her personal experiences as a mother, child, and mixed-race American of Korean and Mongolian ancestry with poetry of piercing emotion and intelligent turns of phrase, Cropp elaborates the complexities of identity, religion, and family.
In an effort to demystify the "strange world" of the American "quadroon," mixed-race women of color thought to be one-quarter African, the author disentangles these women from their symbolic function as racially and sexually exotic, promiscuous, and materialistic.
In Between and Out of Place: Mixed-Race Identity, Liquor, and the Law in British Columbia, 1850-1914.

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