mnemic


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mnemic

(ˈniːmɪk)
adj
(Psychology) psychol relating to the ability to retain memory
Translations
mnestisch
References in classic literature ?
1921; "Die mnemischen Empfindungen," Leipzig, l909), we will give the name of "mnemic phenomena" to those responses of an organism which, so far as hitherto observed facts are concerned, can only be brought under causal laws by including past occurrences in the history of the organism as part of the causes of the present response.
Accordingly your recollection is an instance of what we are calling "mnemic phenomena."
Before going further, it will be well to give illustrations of different classes of mnemic phenomena.
Thus all our habitual knowledge consists of acquired habits, and comes under the head of mnemic phenomena.
It is generally believed that all images, in their simpler parts, are copies of sensations; if so, their mnemic character is evident.
In that case there is a large mnemic element in all the common perceptions by means of which we handle common objects.
It is therefore a mnemic phenomenon according to our definition.
It is only mnemic phenomena that embody experience.
The best writer on mnemic phenomena known to me is Richard Semon, the fundamental part of whose theory I shall endeavour to summarize before going further:
"Mnemic phenomena" are defined as those due to engrams; in animals, they are specially associated with the nervous system, but not exclusively, even in man.
Semon formulates two "mnemic principles." The first, or "Law of Engraphy," is as follows: "All simultaneous excitements in an organism form a connected simultaneous excitement-complex, which as such works engraphically, i.e.
Some of them will concern us later, but for the present it is the fundamental character of mnemic phenomena that is in question.