mnemotechnic

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mnemotechnic

(ˌniːməʊˈtɛknɪk)
n
1. (Psychology) the capacity or potential of memory
2. (Psychology) another word for mnemonic
adj
(Psychology) another word for mnemonic
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.mnemotechnic - of or relating to or involved the practice of aiding the memorymnemotechnic - of or relating to or involved the practice of aiding the memory; "mnemonic device"
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References in periodicals archive ?
The "industrial exteriorization of memory" or mnemotechnics, as Bernard Stiegler (2003) calls it, can transform "the conditions of being together" with a separation and indeterminacy (pp.
In part this is due to the emphasis Stiegler places on mnemotechnics; picking up on Geoffrey Bennington's early observation that the concept of tool is too restrictive, Hansen argues that '[b]ecause of Stiegler's unbending commitment to memory, his explanation cannot even recognise that there is a more primordial level at which technology impacts (or "contaminates") experience' (Technics Beyond, p50).
Josh Cohen -- Creator of the Mnemotechnics Forum and Memory Techniques Wiki.
Yates describe esta situacion con claridad cuando dice: "It has usually been classed as 'mnemotechnics', which in modern times seems a rather unimportant branch of human activity.
"Beyond Mnemotechnics: Confession and Memory in Augustine." Philosophy and Rhetoric 39.3 (2006): 233-53.
In arguing how human judgments and effects of subjectivity emerge from the impersonal mechanics of semiotic systems which they cannot fully command, de Man's concern with an inhuman mnemotechnics "would not be unrelated to nonhuman zones of life-forms and dynamic processes (DNA, abiosemiosis)" (108).
As in other Roman writers, in Cicero the most important feature of the relationship between history and memory was the possibility of placing the art of mnemotechnics at the service of orators, for whom the evocation of the past was a crucial tool to boost eloquence and therefore to persuade the audience (CODONER 1995, p.
(19) But he also had Nietszche to consult, for example the following passage from the Genealogy explaining the "mnemotechnics" of the ascetic ideal: "'If something is to stay in the memory," he explains, "it must be burned in ..." (G61).
Mnemotechnics: Some limitations of the mnemonic keyword method for the study of foreign language vocabulary.
(1975), "Mnemotechnics in Second-Language Learning," American Psychologist, 27, 821-828.
Busse Berger, 'Mnemotechnics and Notre Dame Polyphony', Journal of Musicology 14 (1996), 263-98.
Godard's provocation is to suggest that Turner, not Delacroix or anyone else, is the Baudelairean painter par excellence, the painter with the most original mnemotechnics and the most capacious "dictionary of nature" out of which unknown worlds come into being.