mockernut


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mockernut

(ˈmɒkəˌnʌt)
n
1. (Plants) Also called: black hickory a species of smooth-barked hickory, Carya tomentosa, with fragrant foliage that turns bright yellow in autumn
2. (Cookery) the nut of this tree
[so called because the nut is difficult to extract]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mockernut - smooth-barked North American hickory with 7 to 9 leaflets bearing a hard-shelled edible nutmockernut - smooth-barked North American hickory with 7 to 9 leaflets bearing a hard-shelled edible nut
Carya, genus Carya - genus of large deciduous nut-bearing trees; United States and China
hickory tree, hickory - American hardwood tree bearing edible nuts
References in periodicals archive ?
These include black gum (Nyssa sylvatica), chestnut oak (Quercus montana), chinkapin oak (Quercus muehlenbergii), common persimmon (Diospyros virginiana), cucumbertree (Magnolia acuminate), mockernut hickory (Carya tomentosa), pignut hickory (Carya glabra), shumard oak (Queruc shumardii), sugarberry (Celtis laevigata) and yellowwood (Cladrastis kentukea).
ailanthus Alnus glutinosa European alder Betula alleghaniensis yellow birch Betula lenta sweet birch Betula nigra river birch Carya alba mockernut hickory Carya cordiformis bitternut hickory Carya glabra pignut hickory Carya laciniosa shellbark hickory Carya ovata shagbark hickory Carya spp.
COMMON NAMES: True Hickory Group: Hickory, shagbark, shellbark, mockernut, pignut Pecan Hickory Group: pecan, bitternut, water and nutmeg hickory.
tomentosa (mockernut hickory) were the other common species in the overstory.
The tree data of the miscellaneous group (mockernut hickory [Carya tomentosa], shagbark hickory [C.
The Shellbark Hickory, Carya laciniosa, with its shaggy bark, and the Mockernut Hickory, Carya tomentosa, are two hickory trees that have excellent fall color.
Carya alba (L.) Nutt.; SYN: Carya tomentosa (Lam.) Nutt.; Mockernut Hickory; C = 6; BSUH 16374, 16406.
(14.) Being unsure what type of hickory was used in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, I list the average for five types of hickory (Mockernut, Pignut, Shagbark, Shellbark, Bitternut) that were prevalent in areas of the eastern United States where wood may have been harvested.
Another reason that would-be nutpickers do not gather hickory nuts is that they cannot differentiate the shagbark hickory from its bitternut and mockernut relatives, which do not bear edible nuts.