modality


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Related to modality: treatment modality

mo·dal·i·ty

 (mō-dăl′ĭ-tē)
n. pl. mo·dal·i·ties
1. The fact, state, or quality of being modal.
2. A tendency to conform to a general pattern or belong to a particular group or category.
3. Logic The classification of propositions on the basis of whether they assert or deny the possibility, impossibility, contingency, or necessity of their content. Also called mode.
4. modalities The ceremonial forms, protocols, or conditions that surround formal agreements or negotiations: "[He] grew so enthusiastic about our prospects that he began to speculate on the modalities of signing" (Henry A. Kissinger).
5. Medicine A therapeutic method or agent, such as surgery, chemotherapy, or electrotherapy, that involves the physical treatment of a disorder.
6. Physiology Any of the various types of sensation, such as vision or hearing.

modality

(məʊˈdælɪtɪ)
n, pl -ties
1. the condition of being modal
2. a quality, attribute, or circumstance that denotes mode, mood, or manner
3. (Logic) logic the property of a statement of being classified under one of the concepts studied by modal logic, esp necessity or possibility
4. (Medicine) any physical or electrical therapeutic method or agency
5. (Physiology) any of the five senses

mo•dal•i•ty

(moʊˈdæl ɪ ti)

n., pl. -ties.
1. the quality or state of being modal.
2. an attribute or circumstance that denotes mode or manner.
3. Also called mode. the classification of logical propositions according to whether they are contingently true or false, possible, impossible, or necessary.
4. Med. a therapeutic method.
5. one of the primary forms of sensation, as vision or touch.
[1610–20; < Medieval Latin]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.modality - a classification of propositions on the basis of whether they claim necessity or possibility or impossibility
logical relation - a relation between propositions
2.modality - verb inflections that express how the action or state is conceived by the speaker
grammatical relation - a linguistic relation established by grammar
common mood, declarative, declarative mood, fact mood, indicative, indicative mood - a mood (grammatically unmarked) that represents the act or state as an objective fact
subjunctive, subjunctive mood - a mood that represents an act or state (not as a fact but) as contingent or possible
optative, optative mood - a mood (as in Greek or Sanskrit) that expresses a wish or hope; expressed in English by modal verbs
imperative, imperative form, imperative mood, jussive mood - a mood that expresses an intention to influence the listener's behavior
interrogative mood, interrogative - some linguists consider interrogative sentences to constitute a mood
3.modality - a particular sensemodality - a particular sense      
sensory faculty, sentiency, sentience, sense, sensation - the faculty through which the external world is apprehended; "in the dark he had to depend on touch and on his senses of smell and hearing"
visual modality, visual sense, vision, sight - the ability to see; the visual faculty
somatosense - any of the sensory systems that mediate sensations of pressure and tickle and warmth and cold and vibration and limb position and limb movement and pain
audition, auditory modality, auditory sense, sense of hearing, hearing - the ability to hear; the auditory faculty; "his hearing was impaired"
gustation, gustatory modality, sense of taste, taste - the faculty of distinguishing sweet, sour, bitter, and salty properties in the mouth; "his cold deprived him of his sense of taste"
olfaction, olfactory modality, sense of smell, smell - the faculty that enables us to distinguish scents
4.modality - a method of therapy that involves physical or electrical therapeutic treatment
treatment, intervention - care provided to improve a situation (especially medical procedures or applications that are intended to relieve illness or injury)
diathermy - a method of physical therapy that involves generating local heat in body tissues by high-frequency electromagnetic currents
physiatrics, physical therapy, physiotherapy - therapy that uses physical agents: exercise and massage and other modalities
Translations
modalitate

modality

[məʊˈdælɪtɪ] Nmodalidad f

modality

nModalität f

mo·dal·i·ty

n. modalidad, cualquier método de aplicación terapeútica.
References in periodicals archive ?
In our multivariate analysis, none of the variables that were collected predicted the use of a specific modality for distal ureteric calculi.
In order to study the modality effect (and other cognitive load effects) in its processes, it is essential to measure cognitive load as directly and objectively as possible.
In addition to speech acts and alternation in discourse, this study examined modality in detail, which has a close relationship to pragmatic factors.
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Linguists explore issues pertaining to the expression of epistemic modality and evidentiality in relation to other linguistic categories and notions in the languages of Europe and the world from different angles and perspectives.
Mechanical ventilation (MV) can be classified as a supportive treatment modality for hypoxemic respiratory failurel ARDS, as we do not have any data to support MV as a curative treatment modality for ARDS.
It is not just a question of finding a good match between patient and treatment modality (2), but of acting in a concerted manner upon the various deficit areas of the patient (3,4).
Wichita, KS, February 01, 2017 --(PR.com)-- Modality Keyboard allows users to type on their Samsung Watch at least 42 words per minute.
Frank Hoffman builds upon Freier's concept and includes "criminality" within the disruptive modality, since criminal activities are closely intertwined in many of the current gray zone or limited war conflicts--as in the case of ISIL.