modernism

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mod·ern·ism

 (mŏd′ər-nĭz′əm)
n.
1.
a. Modern thought, character, or practice.
b. Sympathy with or conformity to modern ideas, practices, or standards.
2. A peculiarity of usage or style, as of a word or phrase, that is characteristic of modern times.
3. often Modernism The deliberate departure from tradition and the use of innovative forms of expression that distinguish many styles in the arts and literature of the 1900s.
4. often Modernism A Roman Catholic movement, officially condemned in 1907, that attempted to examine traditional belief according to contemporary philosophy, criticism, and historiography.

mod′ern·ist n.
mod′ern·is′tic adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

modernism

(ˈmɒdəˌnɪzəm)
n
1. modern tendencies, characteristics, thoughts, etc, or the support of these
2. something typical of contemporary life or thought
3. (Art Movements) a 20th-century divergence in the arts from previous traditions, esp in architecture. See International Style
4. (Architecture) a 20th-century divergence in the arts from previous traditions, esp in architecture. See International Style
5. (Roman Catholic Church) (capital) RC Church the movement at the end of the 19th and beginning of the 20th centuries that sought to adapt doctrine to the supposed requirements of modern thought
ˈmodernist n, adj
ˌmodernˈistic adj
ˌmodernˈistically adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

mod•ern•ism

(ˈmɒd ərˌnɪz əm)

n.
1. modern character, tendencies, or values.
2. a modern usage or characteristic.
3. (cap.)
a. the movement in Roman Catholic thought that interpreted the teachings of the Church in the light of modern philosophic and scientific thought.
b. the liberal theological tendency in 20th-century Protestantism.
4. (sometimes cap.) estrangement or divergence from the past in the arts and literature occurring esp. in the course of the 20th century and taking form in any of various innovative movements and styles.
[1730–40]
mod′ern•ist, n., adj.
mod`ern•is′tic, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

modernism

a mode of expression or practice characteristic of modern times. — modernist, n.modernistic, adj.
See also: Art
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.modernism - genre of art and literature that makes a self-conscious break with previous genresmodernism - genre of art and literature that makes a self-conscious break with previous genres
genre - a class of art (or artistic endeavor) having a characteristic form or technique
2.modernism - the quality of being current or of the presentmodernism - the quality of being current or of the present; "a shopping mall would instill a spirit of modernity into this village"
currentness, up-to-dateness, currency - the property of belonging to the present time; "the currency of a slang term"
3.modernism - practices typical of contemporary life or thought
practice, pattern - a customary way of operation or behavior; "it is their practice to give annual raises"; "they changed their dietary pattern"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

modernism

[ˈmɒdənɪzəm] Nmodernismo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

modernism

nModernismus m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

modernism

[ˈmɒdənɪzəm] n (Art) → modernismo
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
conventions and (modernistically) undermine those conventions by
His stubby, phallic towers are neither romantically misty nor modernistically austere.
These carefully planned steps to formalizing the art of musical and vocal expression, rather than to banish whiteness forever from the broad messages being presented, strengthened a general sense that African roots and even mythic transcendences were part of shaping a new, if modernistically agonized, archetype, one that Mailer and Kerouac had craved and were busy penning as being true to the form of modern whiteness.
Elvesham recognises, modernistically, that the human subject is 'but a system of memories'.