modern

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mod·ern

 (mŏd′ərn)
adj.
1.
a. Of or relating to recent times or the present: modern history.
b. Characteristic or expressive of recent times or the present; contemporary or up-to-date: a modern lifestyle; a modern way of thinking.
2.
a. Of or relating to a recently developed or advanced style, technique, or technology: modern art; modern medicine.
b. Avant-garde; experimental.
3. often Modern Linguistics Of, relating to, or being a living language or group of languages: Modern Italian; Modern Romance languages.
n.
1. One who lives in modern times.
2. One who has modern ideas, standards, or beliefs.
3. Printing Any of a variety of typefaces characterized by strongly contrasted heavy and thin parts.

[French moderne, from Old French, from Late Latin modernus, from Latin modo, in a certain manner, just now, from modō, ablative of modus, manner; see med- in Indo-European roots.]

mod′ern·ly adv.
mod′ern·ness n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

modern

(ˈmɒdən)
adj
1. of, involving, or befitting the present or a recent time; contemporary
2. (Art Terms) of, relating to, or characteristic of contemporary styles or schools of art, literature, music, etc, esp those of an experimental kind
3. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) of, relating to, or characteristic of contemporary styles or schools of art, literature, music, etc, esp those of an experimental kind
4. (Historical Terms) belonging or relating to the period in history from the end of the Middle Ages to the present
n
5. a contemporary person
6. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) printing a type style that originated around the beginning of the 19th century, characterized chiefly by marked contrast between thick and thin strokes. Compare old face
[C16: from Old French, from Late Latin modernus, from modō (adv) just recently, from modus mode]
ˈmodernly adv
ˈmodernness n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

mod•ern

(ˈmɒd ərn)

adj.
1. of or pertaining to present and recent time.
2. characteristic of present and recent time; contemporary.
3. of or pertaining to the historical period following the Middle Ages.
4. of, pertaining to, or characteristic of contemporary styles of art, literature, music, etc., that reject traditionally accepted or sanctioned forms and emphasize individual experimentation and sensibility.
5. (cap.) new (def. 12).
n.
6. a person of modern times.
7. a person whose views and tastes are modern.
8. Print. a type style differentiated from old style by heavy vertical strokes and straight serifs.
[1490–1500; < Middle French moderne < Late Latin modernus= Latin mod(ō) lately, just now (derivative of modus mode1) + -ernus adj. suffix of time]
mod′ern•ly, adv.
mod′ern•ness, n.
syn: modern, recent, late apply to that which is near to or characteristic of the present time. modern, which is applied to those things that exist in the present age, sometimes has the connotation of up-to-date and, thus, good: modern ideas. That which is recent is separated from the present or the time of action by only a short interval; it is new, fresh, and novel: recent developments. late may mean nearest to the present moment: the late reports on the battle.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.modern - a contemporary person
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
2.modern - a typeface (based on an 18th century design by Gianbattista Bodoni) distinguished by regular shape and hairline serifs and heavy downstrokes
proportional font - any font whose different characters have different widths
old style, old style font - a typeface (based on an 18th century design) distinguished by irregularity and slanted ascender serifs and little contrast between light and heavy strokes
Adj.1.modern - belonging to the modern era; since the Middle Ages; "modern art"; "modern furniture"; "modern history"; "totem poles are modern rather than prehistoric"
current - occurring in or belonging to the present time; "current events"; "the current topic"; "current negotiations"; "current psychoanalytic theories"; "the ship's current position"
late - being or occurring at an advanced period of time or after a usual or expected time; "late evening"; "late 18th century"; "a late movie"; "took a late flight"; "had a late breakfast"
new - not of long duration; having just (or relatively recently) come into being or been made or acquired or discovered; "a new law"; "new cars"; "a new comet"; "a new friend"; "a new year"; "the New World"
nonmodern - not modern; of or characteristic of an earlier time
2.modern - relating to a recently developed fashion or stylemodern - relating to a recently developed fashion or style; "their offices are in a modern skyscraper"; "tables in modernistic designs";
fashionable, stylish - being or in accordance with current social fashions; "fashionable clothing"; "the fashionable side of town"; "a fashionable cafe"
3.modern - characteristic of present-day art and music and literature and architecture
nonclassical - not classical
4.modern - ahead of the timesmodern - ahead of the times; "the advanced teaching methods"; "had advanced views on the subject"; "a forward-looking corporation"; "is British industry innovative enough?"
progressive - favoring or promoting progress; "progressive schools"
5.Modern - used of a living language; being the current stage in its development; "Modern English"; "New Hebrew is Israeli Hebrew"
linguistics - the scientific study of language
late - of a later stage in the development of a language or literature; used especially of dead languages; "Late Greek"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

modern

adjective
1. current, present, contemporary, recent, late, present-day, latter-day the problem of materialism in modern society
2. up-to-date, latest, fresh, new, novel, with it (informal), plugged-in (slang), up-to-the-minute, newfangled, neoteric (rare) a more tailored and modern style
up-to-date old, former, past, square (informal), ancient, old-fashioned, obsolete, archaic, antiquated, outmoded, passé, old hat, uncool (slang)
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

modern

adjective
1. Of or relating to the present or times close to the present:
2. Characteristic of recent times or informed of what is current:
noun
A person of the present age:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
عَصْريعَصْرِيٌّ
moderní
moderne
moderna
nykyaikainenmoderni
moderan
modern
nútíma-
現代の
현대의
dabartinė kalbagyva kalbamodernintimodernizacijamodernizuoti
moderns, mūsdienu-
sodoben
modern
สมัยใหม่
hiện đại

modern

[ˈmɒdən]
A. ADJmoderno
"all modern conveniences"todo confort
B. CPD modern art Narte m moderno
modern history Nhistoria f contemporánea
modern languages NPL (esp Brit) → lenguas fpl modernas
modern literature Nliteratura f contemporánea
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

modern

[ˈmɒdərn] adjmoderne
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

modern

adjmodern (also Art, Liter); times, world alsoheutig; historyneuere und neueste; Modern Greek etcNeugriechisch ntetc
nAnhänger(in) m(f)der Moderne
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

modern

[ˈmɒdn] adjmoderno/a
all modern conveniences → tutti i comfort
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

modern

(ˈmodən) adjective
belonging to the present or to recent times; not old or ancient. modern furniture/clothes.
moˈdernity (-ˈdəː-) noun
ˈmodernness noun
ˈmodernize, ˈmodernise verb
to bring up to date. We should modernize the education system.
ˌmoderniˈzation, ˌmoderniˈsation noun
modern language
a language spoken nowadays (as opposed to ancient Greek, Latin etc).
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

modern

عَصْرِيٌّ moderní moderne modern σύγχρονος moderno nykyaikainen moderne moderan moderno 現代の 현대의 modern moderne nowoczesny moderno современный modern สมัยใหม่ modern hiện đại 现代的
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009

modern

a. moderno-a, reciente.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in classic literature ?
Modern history, in theory, rejects both these principles.
The modern bourgeois society that has sprouted from the ruins of feudal society has not done away with clash antagonisms.
This change, which I report with sincerity and reflect on with amazement, is, as I suspect, mainly the result of certain wholesale modern improvements in the position of contemporary Art, which have necessitated improvements and alterations in the business of picture-dealing.
It makes him pre- eminently a modern poet--a poet of the self-pondering, perfectly educated, modern world, which, having come to the end of all direct and purely external experiences, must necessarily turn for its entertainment to the world within:--
AN Ancient Maiden, standing on the edge of a wharf near a Modern Swain, was overheard rehearsing the words:
Modern education includes morality; therefore the modern child seeks only entertainment in its wonder tales and gladly dispenses with all disagreeable incident.
It is by the medium of my dreams that I, the modern man, look through the eyes of Big-Tooth and see.
In the penultimate verse he makes known his discovery concerning the root of modern Nihilism and indifference,--i.e., that modern man has no goal, no aim, no ideals
As a child I had not been content with the results promised by the modern professors of natural science.
Inside the summer-house the butterfly-brightness of the women in their summer dresses shone radiant out of the gloom shed round it by the dreary modern clothing of the men.
The two gentlemen, who conducted me to the island, were pressed by their private affairs to return in three days, which I employed in seeing some of the modern dead, who had made the greatest figure, for two or three hundred years past, in our own and other countries of Europe; and having been always a great admirer of old illustrious families, I desired the governor would call up a dozen or two of kings, with their ancestors in order for eight or nine generations.
That is to say, I was studying manners, in the elder sense of the word, wherever I could get at them in the frank life of the people about me, and in such literature of Italy as was then modern. In this pursuit I made a discovery that greatly interested me, and that specialized my inquiries.