modicum


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mod·i·cum

 (mŏd′ĭ-kəm)
n.
A small amount of something: "England still expects a modicum of eccentricity in its artists" (Ian Jack).

[Middle English, from Latin, from neuter of modicus, moderate, from modus, measure; see med- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

modicum

(ˈmɒdɪkəm)
n
a small amount or portion
[C15: from Latin: a little way, from modicus moderate]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

mod•i•cum

(ˈmɒd ɪ kəm)

n.
a moderate or small amount.
[1425–75; late Middle English < Latin, n. use of neuter of modicus moderate]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.modicum - a small or moderate or token amountmodicum - a small or moderate or token amount; "England still expects a modicum of eccentricity in its artists"- Ian Jack
small indefinite amount, small indefinite quantity - an indefinite quantity that is below average size or magnitude
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

modicum

noun little, bit, drop, touch, inch, scrap, dash, grain, particle, fragment, atom, pinch, ounce, shred, small amount, crumb, tinge, mite, tad (informal, chiefly U.S.), speck, iota I like to think I've had a modicum of success.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

modicum

noun
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
قَليل
trocha
smule
kis mennyiség
ögn; lítilræîi; lágmark
mazumiņš
azıcıkküçük miktar

modicum

[ˈmɒdɪkəm] N a modicum ofun mínimo de
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

modicum

[ˈmɒdɪkəm] n
a modicum of → un minimum de
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

modicum

n a modicum (of)ein wenig, ein bisschen; with a modicum of luckmit ein wenig or mit einem Quäntchen Glück; a modicum of hope/intelligenceein Funke m(von) Hoffnung/Intelligenz; a modicum of truthein Körnchen ntWahrheit
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

modicum

[ˈmɒdɪkəm] n a modicum ofun minimo di
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

modicum

(ˈmodikəm) noun
a small quantity.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
And others are proud of their modicum of righteousness, and for the sake of it do violence to all things: so that the world is drowned in their unrighteousness.
Had the modicum been less, I should have known my duty.
Her modicum of strength had been exhausted, and she was unable even to move from her position.
Hunger was pushed out of the tall houses, in the wretched clothing that hung upon poles and lines; Hunger was patched into them with straw and rag and wood and paper; Hunger was repeated in every fragment of the small modicum of firewood that the man sawed off; Hunger stared down from the smokeless chimneys, and started up from the filthy street that had no offal, among its refuse, of anything to eat.
But to stand working slowly in a field, and feel the creep of rain-water, first in legs and shoulders, then on hips and head, then at back, front, and sides, and yet to work on till the leaden light diminishes and marks that the sun is down, demands a distinct modicum of stoicism, even of valour.
Large sums of money, due at a certain time, were wanted by Percival (I say nothing of the modicum equally necessary to myself), and the one source to look to for supplying them was the fortune of his wife, of which not one farthing was at his disposal until her death.
I kept another small loaf, and a modicum of cheese, on a particular shelf of a particular cupboard, to make my supper on when I came back at night.
Cold, light, and selfish in the last resort, he had that modicum of prudence, miscalled morality, which keeps a man from inconvenient drunkenness or punishable theft.
He had been obliged to fight the farm and his father for even a modicum of them--the things that made life worth living.
Only a scanty modicum of daylight entered to war with the trembling rays of the ikon lamp.
Principality Premiership NEWPORT v RGC TOMORROW, 2.30PM By ROB GRIFFITHS RGC sealed a modicum of revenge in their second meeting of the season, knocking Sunday's opponents out of the National Cup in the first round with a 35-17 win, the match being played at the Arms Park in Cardiff, again due to County's Cup fixtures.
In fact Washington needs Pakistan more than ever if it wants to extricate itself out of Afghanistan with a modicum of dignity.