mod

(redirected from modly)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.
Related to modly: moldy

mod 1

 (mŏd)
n.
An unconventionally modern style of fashionable dress originating in England in the 1960s.
adj.
1. In or characteristic of this unconventionally modern style.
2. Fashionably up-to-date, especially in style, design, or dress.

[After the Mods, name of several gangs of English youths in the 1960s, short for modern.]

mod 2

abbr. Mathematics
modulus

mod

(mɒd)
n
(Sociology)
a. a member of a group of teenagers in the mid-1960s, noted for their clothes-consciousness and opposition to the rockers
b. a member of a revived group of this type in the late 1970s and early 1980s, noted for their clothes-consciousness and opposition to the skinheads
c. (as modifier): a mod haircut.
[C20: from modernist]

mod

(mɒd)
n
1. (Music, other) an annual Highland Gaelic meeting with musical and literary competitions
2. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) an annual Highland Gaelic meeting with musical and literary competitions
[C19: from Gaelic mòd assembly, from Old Norse; related to moot]

mod

(mɒd) maths
abbreviation for
(Mathematics) modulus

MOD

(in Britain) abbreviation for
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) Ministry of Defence

mod

(mɒd)

adj.
1. very modern in style, dress, etc.
2. (sometimes cap.) of or pertaining to a style of dress of the 1960s, typified by miniskirts, bell-bottom trousers, and boots.
n.
3. a person who is mod.
4. (sometimes cap.) a British teenager of the 1960s who affected Edwardian dress.
[1955–60; shortened form of modern]

mod.

1. moderate.
2. modern.
3. modification.

mod

Music produced by British bands of the 1960s in the style of American R&B.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mod - a British teenager or young adult in the 1960smod - a British teenager or young adult in the 1960s; noted for their clothes consciousness and opposition to the rockers
mods - a youth subculture that began in London in the early 1960s; a working-class movement with highly stylized dress and short hair; listened to rhythm and blues music and travelled on motor scooters
Britain, Great Britain, U.K., UK, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; `Great Britain' is often used loosely to refer to the United Kingdom
adolescent, stripling, teen, teenager - a juvenile between the onset of puberty and maturity
Adj.1.mod - relating to a recently developed fashion or stylemod - relating to a recently developed fashion or style; "their offices are in a modern skyscraper"; "tables in modernistic designs";
fashionable, stylish - being or in accordance with current social fashions; "fashionable clothing"; "the fashionable side of town"; "a fashionable cafe"

mod

adjective
1. Being or in accordance with the current fashion:
Informal: classy, in, sharp, snappy, swish, tony, trendy.
Slang: with-it.
2. Characteristic of recent times or informed of what is current:
Translations

MOD

N ABBR (Brit) =Ministry of DefenceMin. de D.

mod

adj (dated sl)modern, poppig (inf)
n (dated sl) modisch gekleideter Halbstarker in den 60er Jahren

mod

[mɒd] n (fam) (person) → mod inv
References in periodicals archive ?
The ceremony was attended by the Undersecretary of the US Navy, Thomas Modly, the former Commander of the 5th Fleet, Vice Admiral Kevin Donegan, a number of officials in the US Ministries of Defense, Foreign Affairs and the Navy, as well as some experts and researchers in the defense field, in coordination with the military attache at the Embassy of the Kingdom of Bahrain in Washington, DC.
If confirmed, Modly would replace Obama-holdover Thomas Dee, who recently expressed pessimism about the Navys own much-needed 355-ship requirement.
Natalie Modly, Shannon Williams and Bella Pyne each added two goals for Oregon, which had season highs in goals, assists (11), points (30) and shots.
Helen Modly, CFP, ChFC, CPWA; Focus Wealth Management, Ltd.
Klink (2004: 1) and Modly (2006: 1) has found that clients primarily require two features from a financial advisor; namely excellent service and a long-term relationship, and that a successful closing ratio, or transaction rate, may be directly ascribed to happy, satisfied clients (Vessenes, K.