moist

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Related to moister: monster

moist

 (moist)
adj. moist·er, moist·est
1. Slightly wet; damp: a moist sponge; a dog's moist nose.
2. Humid: the moist gulf air.
3. Characterized by considerable rainfall; rainy: a moist climate.
4. Juicy or succulent; not dried out: Basting keeps the turkey moist in the oven.
5. Tearful: moist eyes.

[Middle English moiste, from Old French, alteration (influenced by Latin musteus, juicy) of Vulgar Latin *muscidus, alteration of Latin mūcidus, moldy, from mūcus, mucus.]

moist′ly adv.
moist′ness n.

moist

(mɔɪst)
adj
1. slightly damp or wet
2. saturated with or suggestive of moisture
[C14: from Old French, ultimately related to Latin mūcidus musty, from mūcus mucus]
ˈmoistly adv
ˈmoistness n

moist

(mɔɪst)

adj. -er, -est.
1. slightly wet; damp.
2. (of the eyes) tearful.
3. (of the air) having high humidity.
[1325–75; Middle English moiste < Middle French, perhaps < Vulgar Latin *muscidus, a cross of Latin mūcidus musty, with musteus juicy, adj. derivative of mustum must2]
moist′ly, adv.
moist′ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.moist - slightly wetmoist - slightly wet; "clothes damp with perspiration"; "a moist breeze"; "eyes moist with tears"
wet - covered or soaked with a liquid such as water; "a wet bathing suit"; "wet sidewalks"; "wet weather"

moist

adjective damp, wet, dripping, rainy, soggy, humid, dank, clammy, dewy, not dry, drizzly, dampish, wettish Wipe off any excess with a clean, moist flannel.

moist

adjective
Slightly wet:
Translations
رطْب، مُبْتَلمُبَلّلُ
vlhký
fugtig
feuchthumide
kostea
vlažan
nyirkos
rakur
湿った
축축한
drėkinamasis kremasdrėkinamasis pienelispalaikyti drėgnumą
mikls, valgsmitrs
vlažen
fuktig
ชื้น
nemlirutubetliıslak
ẩm ướt

moist

[mɔɪst] ADJ (moister (compar) (moistest (superl))) [atmosphere, soil, cloth] → húmedo; [cake] → esponjoso
moist with sthhúmedo de algo
his hands were moist with perspirationtenía las manos húmedas del sudor
her eyes were moist with tearstenía los ojos llorosos

moist

[ˈmɔɪst] adj
[soil] → humide
Make sure the soil is moist → Assurez-vous que la terre est humide.
[cloth] → humide
[cake] → onctueux/euse; [meat] → juteux/euse

moist

adj (+er)feucht (→ from, with vor +dat); moist with tearsfeucht von Tränen, tränenfeucht; moist with dewtaufeucht

moist

[mɔɪst] adj (-er (comp) (-est (superl))) (gen) → umido/a; (cake) → soffice
eyes moist with tears → occhi umidi di lacrime

moist

(moist) adjective
damp; slightly wet. moist, fertile soil.
ˈmoistly adverb
ˈmoistness noun
moisten (ˈmoisn) verb
to wet slightly. He moistened (= licked) his lips.
moisture (ˈmoistʃə) noun
(the quality of) dampness. This soil needs moisture.
ˈmoisturize, ˈmoisturise (-stʃə-) verb
to keep the moisture in (skin). This cream is used to moisturize the skin.
ˈmoisturizer, ˈmoisturiser noun

moist

مُبَلّلُ vlhký fugtig feucht υγρός húmedo kostea moite vlažan umido 湿った 축축한 vochtig fuktig wilgotny húmido, úmido влажный fuktig ชื้น ıslak ẩm ướt 潮湿的

moist

adj húmedo
References in classic literature ?
Finding my first seed did not grow, which I easily imagined was by the drought, I sought for a moister piece of ground to make another trial in, and I dug up a piece of ground near my new bower, and sowed the rest of my seed in February, a little before the vernal equinox; and this having the rainy months of March and April to water it, sprung up very pleasantly, and yielded a very good crop; but having part of the seed left only, and not daring to sow all that I had, I had but a small quantity at last, my whole crop not amounting to above half a peck of each kind.
Others, men and women, dipped in the puddles with little mugs of mutilated earthenware, or even with handkerchiefs from women's heads, which were squeezed dry into infants' mouths; others made small mud- embankments, to stem the wine as it ran; others, directed by lookers-on up at high windows, darted here and there, to cut off little streams of wine that started away in new directions; others devoted themselves to the sodden and lee-dyed pieces of the cask, licking, and even champing the moister wine-rotted fragments with eager relish.
That means the coastal areas of Sri Lanka are going to be battered again, after an uneasy, short-lived calm, if it grows fast with the abundance of moister over the surface of the sea.
This occurs as drier air is mixed downward and moister air is mixed upward, they wrote.
The moister content of liver, muscle, viscera and whole body were not significantly different in control and treated ponds.
This prolonged contact, exacerbated by the moister environment of a cloth diaper, may account for the unusual, severe presentation seen in these cases.
The culprit for the oncoming heat is a high-pressure ridge over the Pacific Northwest that is keeping out cooler, moister ocean air, the weather service said.
Staff at St Helens and Knowsley Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, which provides mortuary services for Southport Hospital, have now offered a full apology to both families, while Moister Funeral Directors said they were confident that their identification procedures had been followed.
Changes you feel rather than see include moister, cleaner air at a lower cabin pressure (5-6,000ft rather than the typical 8,000ft), which allows the absorption of more oxygen into the blood to reduce the chance of dehydration and headaches.
In those days, however, homes were cooler and moister, and thus more to the liking of ferns.
Also new this year is PeroxiClear 3% hydrogen peroxide cleaning and disinfecting solution, formulated to keep contact lenses cleaner and moister for longer than peroxide-based alternatives.