molasses


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to molasses: blackstrap molasses

mo·las·ses

 (mə-lăs′ĭz)
n. pl. molasses
1. A thick syrup produced in refining raw sugar and ranging from light to dark brown in color.
2. Any of various thick syrups made from juice extracted from the fruits or stalks of certain plants: pomegranate molasses.

[Portuguese melaços, pl. of melaço, from Late Latin mellāceum, must, from Latin mel, mell-, honey; see melit- in Indo-European roots.]

molasses

(məˈlæsɪz)
n (functioning as singular)
1. (Cookery) the thick brown uncrystallized bitter syrup obtained from sugar during refining
2. (Cookery) US and Canadian a dark viscous syrup obtained during the refining of sugar. Also called (in Britain and certain other countries): treacle
[C16: from Portuguese melaço, from Late Latin mellāceum must, from Latin mel honey]

mo•las•ses

(məˈlæs ɪz)

n.
a thick syrup produced during the refining of sugar or from sorghum, usu. dark brown in color.
[1575–85; earlier molassos, molasso(e)s < Portuguese melaços, pl. of melaço (< Late Latin mellācium half-boiled new wine, derivative of Latin mel honey)]

molasses

A by-product of sugar refining that can be used as a spread or in a similar way to golden syrup in recipes.

Molasses

A term now applied to the residual syrup from sugarmaking but, in farming communities, “molasses” meant the boiled-down juice of sweet sorghum cane.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Molasses - thick dark syrup produced by boiling down juice from sugar canemolasses - thick dark syrup produced by boiling down juice from sugar cane; especially during sugar refining
sirup, syrup - a thick sweet sticky liquid
Translations
دِبْس السُّكَّردِبْسُ السُكَّر
melasa
melassesirup
siirappi
šećerni sirup
melasz
melassi, síróp
糖蜜
당밀
melasasirupas
melasesīrups
melass
น้ำเชื่อม
melasşeker pekmezi
mật đường

molasses

[məˈlæsɪz] NSINGmelaza f

molasses

[məˈlæsɪz] nmélasse f

molasses

nMelasse f; to be as slow as molasses (in winter) (US inf) → eine (fürchterliche) Transuse sein (inf)

molasses

[məʊˈlæsɪz] nsgmelassa

molasses

(məˈlӕsiz) noun
(American) treacle.

Molasses

دِبْسُ السُكَّر melasa sirup Sirup μελάσα melaza siirappi mélasse šećerni sirup melassa 糖蜜 당밀 stroop melasse melasa melaço патока melass น้ำเชื่อม melas mật đường 糖蜜
References in classic literature ?
Don't try too many messes, Jo, for you can't make anything but gingerbread and molasses candy fit to eat.
The family had been living on corncakes and sorghum molasses for three days.
One complained of a bad cold in his head, upon which Jonah mixed him a pitch-like potion of gin and molasses, which he swore was a sovereign cure for all colds and catarrhs whatsoever, never mind of how long standing, or whether caught off the coast of Labrador, or on the weather side of an ice-island.
Here the boys emerged from under the table, and, with hands and faces well plastered with molasses, began a vigorous kissing of the baby.
The molasses, vinegar, and kerosene had lasted the family for five years, and the Perkins attic was still a treasure-house of ginghams, cottons, and "Yankee notions.
His master, in many cases, goes off to town, and buys a large quantity; he returns, takes his whip, and commands the slave to eat the molasses, until the poor fellow is made sick at the very mention of it.
If he wished for a barrel of molasses, he might purchase it with a pile of pine boards.
At one time they must have been full of good old slow West Indiamen of the square-stern type, that took their captivity, one imagines, as stolidly as they had faced the buffeting of the waves with their blunt, honest bows, and disgorged sugar, rum, molasses, coffee, or logwood sedately with their own winch and tackle.
On one was piled certain curiously twisted and complicated figures, called “nut-cakes,” On another were heaps of a black-looking sub stance, which, receiving its hue from molasses, was properly termed “sweet-cake ;” a wonderful favorite in the coterie of Remarkable, A third was filled, to use the language of the housekeeper, with “cards of gingerbread ;” and the last held a “ plum- cake,” so called from the number of large raisins that were showing their black heads in a substance of suspiciously similar color.
He brought a tin cup full, and sweetened it with molasses.
She could trim a hat, make molasses candy, recite "Curfew shall not ring to-night," and play "The Lost Chord" and a pot-pourri from "Carmen.
Parched corn was used for coffee, and a kind of black molasses was used instead of sugar.