mouldboard

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mouldboard

(ˈməʊldˌbɔːd) or

moldboard

n
(Agriculture) the curved blade of a plough, which turns over the furrow
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mouldboard - wedge formed by the curved part of a steel plow blade that turns the furrowmouldboard - wedge formed by the curved part of a steel plow blade that turns the furrow
moldboard plow, mouldboard plough - plow that has a moldboard
wedge - something solid that is usable as an inclined plane (shaped like a V) that can be pushed between two things to separate them
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Farmers, being careful, were slow to accept this, in the same way that they initially resisted steel moldboards, believing they would poison the soil.
For example, based on the surface modification and topography reform by bionics, plow moldboards with reducing soil adhesion and plowing resistance function were developed, according to the working conditions of the tractor-drawn plow moldboard.
Lister plows are equipped with two moldboards mounted back to back, resulting in a pattern of ten-inch-high ridges and furrows across the field (figure 16-9).
Ice Reversible trip moldboards up to 12 ft long are available from Henke Mfg.
"Wings" have been added to the moldboards to ensure complete rolling of the plowed ground.
thick moldboards. The units can be fixed angle or hydraulic power reversible.
It required quite a bit of work on the moldboards and coulters to get it back in shape."
the next time you look at a John Deere plow and see it has thick, cast iron moldboards with the name Syracuse Plow Co cast into the back, you'll know how it all came about.
Dirt stuck to the moldboards' porous surface, which also was soft and wore rapidly.
In certain areas of the Southwest, particularly in Texas, there is a sticky "gumbo" (or black waxy soil) that, especially when wet, adhered to even the smoothest and shiniest steel moldboards. The mud soon built up to the point that the plow would not cut or turn a furrow and became impossible to keep in the ground.
The moldboards were described as "often roughly plated over with pieces of old saw plate" and were considered clumsy.