mollusk


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mol·lusk

also mol·lusc  (mŏl′əsk)
n.
Any of numerous chiefly marine invertebrates of the phylum Mollusca, typically having a soft unsegmented body, a mantle, and a protective calcareous shell, and including the snails, clams, and squids.

[French mollusque, from New Latin Mollusca, phylum name, from neuter pl. of Latin molluscus, thin-shelled, from mollis, soft; see mel- in Indo-European roots.]

mol·lus′cous (mə-lŭs′kəs) adj.

mol•lusk

or mol•lusc

(ˈmɒl əsk)

n.
any invertebrate of the phylum Mollusca, having a calcareous shell of one or more pieces that wholly or partly enclose the soft, unsegmented body: includes the chitons, snails, bivalves, and octopuses.
[1775–85; < French mollusque < New Latin Mollusca, neuter pl. of Latin molluscus, derivative of mollis soft]
mol•lus•kan, mol•lus•can (məˈlʌs kən) adj., n.

mol·lusk

or mol·lusc (mŏl′əsk)
Any of numerous soft-bodied invertebrate animals, usually living in water and frequently having a hard outer shell. Mollusk bodies have a muscular foot, a well-developed circulatory and nervous system, and often complex eyes. Mollusks include gastropods (snails and shellfish), slugs, octopuses, and squids.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mollusk - invertebrate having a soft unsegmented body usually enclosed in a shellmollusk - invertebrate having a soft unsegmented body usually enclosed in a shell
carapace, cuticle, shell, shield - hard outer covering or case of certain organisms such as arthropods and turtles
invertebrate - any animal lacking a backbone or notochord; the term is not used as a scientific classification
Mollusca, phylum Mollusca - gastropods; bivalves; cephalopods; chitons
scaphopod - burrowing marine mollusk
gastropod, univalve - a class of mollusks typically having a one-piece coiled shell and flattened muscular foot with a head bearing stalked eyes
coat-of-mail shell, polyplacophore, sea cradle, chiton - primitive elongated bilaterally symmetrical marine mollusk having a mantle covered with eight calcareous plates
bivalve, lamellibranch, pelecypod - marine or freshwater mollusks having a soft body with platelike gills enclosed within two shells hinged together
cephalopod, cephalopod mollusk - marine mollusk characterized by well-developed head and eyes and sucker-bearing tentacles
shellfish - meat of edible aquatic invertebrate with a shell (especially a mollusk or crustacean)
Translations

mol·lusc

, mollusk
n. molusco.
References in classic literature ?
Try to conceive of this mollusk gravely applying for an official position, of any kind under the sun
Philip, however, met her advances toward a good understanding very much as a caressed mollusk meets an invitation to show himself out of his shell.
The gently sloping beach along which I walked was thickly strewn with strangely shaped, colored shells; some empty, others still housing as varied a multitude of mollusks as ever might have drawn out their sluggish lives along the silent shores of the antediluvian seas of the outer crust.
You will find in the most out- of-the way villages human mollusks, creatures apparently dead, who have passions for lepidoptera or for conchology, let us say,--beings who will give themselves infinite pains about moths, butterflies, or the concha Veneris.
The scientific celebrities, forgetting their mollusks and glacial periods, gossiped about art, while devoting themselves to oysters and ices with characteristic energy; the young musician, who was charming the city like a second Orpheus, talked horses; and the specimen of the British nobility present happened to be the most ordinary man of the party.
Deadly, my dear Bunny, is not the word for that glorified snag, or for the mollusks, its inhabitants.
Moreover, in addition to her mischances, she believed herself certain of success, never dreaming that Rabourdin was undermined in all directions by the secret sapping of the mollusks.
Such is the case with the recent discovery of a rare type of mollusk in Philippine waters.
Squid Similar to the octopus, this Clean and remove innards mollusk has a soft body and beak before preparing.
Although Unionicola mollusk mites have been traditionally recognized as parasites, there is little known about the nutritional dependence of these mites on their hosts or the impact that unionicolids may have on the hosts with which they are associated.
The continental mollusk collection at UND is taxonomically diverse and comparable to the assemblage reported by Stanton and Yen, but certain taxa are missing.