mom test

mom test

n
informal US a test of the user-friendliness of a computer device or software based on the extent to which a user's mother is able to use it
References in periodicals archive ?
Rob Fitzpatrick, author of 'The Mom Test,' will be speaking to attendees about customer development and the experience of startup failure.
Novey states that "interpretation" fails "the mom test." I would argue that "neurophysiology" fails the mom test too.
where [W.sub.O] is contact width without Fujifilm, F is compressive force (i.e., 750 or 3000 N), [D.sub.cyl] is cylinder diameter (i.e., 0 to 80 mm), [L.sub.cyl] is cylinder length that mimics later experiments (i.e., 75 mm of cylinder length was in contact for MOM tests, but 50 mm of cylinder length was in contact for MOP and MOB tests), [v.sub.cyl] is Poisson's ratio for a steel cylinder (0.31), [v.sub.flat] is Poisson's ratio for steel (0.31), UHMWPE (0.4), or artificial cortical bone (0.3) flat substrate, [E.sub.cyl] is elastic modulus for a steel cylinder (210 GPa), and [E.sub.flat] is elastic modulus for a steel (210 GPa), UHMWPE (0.9 GPa), or artificial cortical bone (16.7 GPa) flat substrate [3, 21, 22,24, 25].
The metal plate was 5 mm thick x 150 mm wide x 150 mm long having an average surface roughness of 1.907 [micro]m (i.e., 0.039% of plate thickness); it was used for all MOM tests. A series of 30 polymer plates (Model # Jaytrex 1000, Johnston Industrial Plastics, Toronto, ON, Canada) were 25 mm thick x 50 mm wide x 50 mm long having an average surface roughness of 0.859 [micro]m (i.e., 0.003% of plate thickness); they were each used only once for MOP tests.