momism


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momism

(ˈmɒmɪzəm)
n
informal US the excessive domination of a child by his or her mother

mom•ism

(ˈmɒm ɪz əm)

n.
undue dependence on maternal protection resulting in loss of maturity and independence.
[coined by U.S. author Philip Wylie (1902–71) in A Generation of Vipers (1942)]

momism

an excessive attachment and devotion of children to their mothers, resulting in a child’s dependence and failure to achieve emotional emancipation.
See also: Mother
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.momism - excessive protectionmomism - excessive protection      
protection - the activity of protecting someone or something; "the witnesses demanded police protection"
References in periodicals archive ?
Jejune: (a) hatred (b) luxurious (c) momism (d) uninteresting 6.
Teen Momism on MTV: Postfeminist Subjectivities in '16 and Pregnant'.
The new momism, by comparison, refers to media's insistence that women foreground motherhood as their most important task and dedicate themselves completely to that role (Douglas & Michaels, 2004).
Mama s Boy: Momism and Homophobia in Postwar American Culture.
Equally important, neo-traditional families are the new norm for many academic women, and this 'new' norm also creates complexity and tension for academic women, because it demands that women simultaneously meet the intensive demands of the new momism while also meeting the intensive and exacting norms and expectations of academia.
In 2012 electoral politics we have the first lady and the aspiring first lady, and a bevy of other politicians, appealing to (white) women voters by proclaiming their allegiance to familialism, momism, and stand-by-your-manism.
The Cold War produced a particularly rich body of writing concerned with the feminizing forces of communism, bureaucracy, consumerism, Momism, and other large, systemic threats, as Timothy Melley, James Gilbert, and Michael Davidson have argued; but the tendency is far older than that.
The new momism is a highly romanticized view of motherhood in which the standards for success are impossible to meet.
This new momism seeks to eradicate hard won social changes brought about by feminism.
254) New momism dictates that mothers are the best primary caretakers of their children and that in order to be a good mother, a woman must devote all of her time, energy, and attention to her child.
A number of recent texts have addressed topics such as "the new momism," "intensive mothering," "motherguilt" and the inherent contradictions in a capitalist society that nonetheless promotes a vision of motherhood that is at odds with the ever increasing pressure to work longer hours and make more money.
In his Afterword to Savage Holiday, Gerald Early reminds us that the 1950s would become the era of Momism, and the pathology marks Richard Wright's 1954 novel as dramatically as it imprints Petry's 1947 work.