momism


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momism

(ˈmɒmɪzəm)
n
informal US the excessive domination of a child by his or her mother

mom•ism

(ˈmɒm ɪz əm)

n.
undue dependence on maternal protection resulting in loss of maturity and independence.
[coined by U.S. author Philip Wylie (1902–71) in A Generation of Vipers (1942)]

momism

an excessive attachment and devotion of children to their mothers, resulting in a child’s dependence and failure to achieve emotional emancipation.
See also: Mother
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.momism - excessive protectionmomism - excessive protection      
protection - the activity of protecting someone or something; "the witnesses demanded police protection"
References in periodicals archive ?
(6) A contemporary iteration of this mythology is the trend of 'New Momism', which espouses that women can 'have it all' -job, love, sex, beauty - while (paradoxically) succumbing to the patriarchal pressure to put their children first.
Jejune: (a) hatred (b) luxurious (c) momism (d) uninteresting 6.
"'Momism' and the Making of Treasonous Homosexuals." "Bad" Mothers: The Politics of Blame in Twentieth-century America, edited by Molly Ladd-Taylor and Lauri Umansky, NYU Press, 1998, pp.
"Teen Momism on MTV: Postfeminist Subjectivities in '16 and Pregnant'." MTV and Teen Pregnancy: Critical Essays on 16 and Pregnant and Teen Mom.
Situating problematic gendered relations against the backdrop of "motorcycle culture," SoA emerged at a time when media was replete with postfeminist portrayals (Douglas, 2010; Gill, 2007), anti-feminist feminism (Rodino-Colocino, 2012), and representations of the "new momism" (Douglas & Michaels, 2004).
Vandenberg-Daves describes a particularly virulent form of scapegoating mothers in the 1940s: Philip Wylie's best-selling Generation of Vipers (1942) invented the term "momism" to attack mothers, unfortunately liberated by modern technology from useful tasks, for dominating and castrating their sons with their sentimental smother-love.
Popular writers and psychologists professed great concern over the damage wrought upon society by this devouring Gothic presence--most notably novelist Philip Wylie, whose fulminations in his best selling 1942 diatribe Generation of Vipers had provided a label for the alleged phenomenon: "Momism." Such was the prevalence of the "Momism" obsession, in print discourse at least, that only a few years after the appearance of Wylie's book Erik Erikson could refer casually to a latterly emerging "literary sport in books decrying the mothers of this country as 'Moms' and as a 'generation of vipers'" (248).
Equally important, neo-traditional families are the new norm for many academic women, and this 'new' norm also creates complexity and tension for academic women, because it demands that women simultaneously meet the intensive demands of the new momism while also meeting the intensive and exacting norms and expectations of academia.
In 2012 electoral politics we have the first lady and the aspiring first lady, and a bevy of other politicians, appealing to (white) women voters by proclaiming their allegiance to familialism, momism, and stand-by-your-manism.
Through the depiction of her depression and through the Sharon-Jimmy relational dynamic, then, Atwood brings out the absurdity of the tenets of "new momism"--"a highly romanticized but demanding view of motherhood" that promulgates "the myth that motherhood is eternally fulfilling or rewarding, that it is always the best and most important thing [mothers] do, that there is only a narrowly prescribed way of doing it right ..." (Douglas and Michaels 34).
(195.) See, e.g., DOUGLAS & MICHAELS, supra note 191, at 5-9 (describing "the new momism" in whichmedia promulgates the view that mothers must perfectly manage every aspect of their children's lives or risk disaster).
The condition was attributed to the weakness of the American society: the soft life that American youth had led since the end of World War Two; and the emasculating effect of American "Momism." (52) Writing in The New Yorker in 26 October 1957, Eugene Kinkead alerted Americans to what he identified as "something new in history"; it was the "wholesale breakdown of morale and the wholesale collaboration with the captors." In previous wars, according to Kinkead, no matter the "rigors of the camps" a "respectable number of prisoners" had managed to escape.