mommy track


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mommy track

n.
A career path determined by work arrangements offering mothers certain benefits, such as flexible hours, but usually providing them with fewer opportunities for advancement.

mommy track

n
US a path in life in which a woman devotes most of her time to her children and home rather than to her career

mom′my track`


n.
a path of career advancement for women who are willing to forgo some promotions and pay increases so that they can spend more time with their children.
[1985–90]
References in periodicals archive ?
CNN identified fear of discrimination in the workplace as one reason women may be reluctant to speak openly about their pregnancies, highlighting research that shows women pay a "motherhood" penalty in lost income and status as soon as they're seen being on the "mommy track." But the anti-abortion movement has also played a key role, aggressively working to confuse women about the science of miscarriage and to punish them when one occurs.
But with great friends, a steely core and a clever mind, Kate shows that women can launch themselves off the mommy track and back into the world.
Some women may consciously choose to be primary caregivers and pull back from work, but there may also be some employers putting women on a 'mommy track' where they get paid less."
Forget the bogus mommy track, discrimination drives the wage gap.
Among those who aren't forced into these less permanent positions are the highly educated and experienced women who are building their own mommy track. Instead of settling for a less fulfilling career in favor of a family, these women get both.
In The Mommy Track Divides: The impact of Childbearing on Wages of Women of Differing Skill Levels (NBER Working Paper No.
Pressures, popularized as the "Mommy Track" in the early 1990s, affect women in a range of vocations.
Halpern and Cheung first situate their analysis by referencing Felice Schwartz's 1989 Harvard Business Review article in which she coined the term "mommy track." The "mommy track" would allow business to acknowledge the care giving responsibilities of women executives through various policy measures such as flexible work schedules.
Of those interviewed for this article, few felt that their time spent working from home impacted their professional opportunities or that they had been placed on the "mommy track," a term coined by Felice Schwartz in an article in the Harvard Business Review, which suggested that lower pay and less advancement was a fair exchange for more flexibility.
323 (1996); Rebecca Korzec, Working on the "Mommy Track": Motherhood and Women Lawyers, 8 HASTINGS WOMEN'S L.J.
And especially if you and your other half fancied yourselves to be sophisticated ladies before you began racing along together on the mommy track.