monachal

monachal

(ˈmɒnəkəl)
adj
(Ecclesiastical Terms) a less common word for monastic
[C16: from Old French, from Church Latin monachālis, from monachus monk]
ˈmonachism n
ˈmonachist adj, n
References in classic literature ?
Therese had appeared herself in her brown garb and as monachal as ever.
Her thin hands were lying on her lap, her facial immobility had in it something monachal. "In Russia," she went on, "all knowledge was tainted with falsehood.
and one would betake onelsef to a cell to make their monachal devotion endure in that 'uzla." (23)
Monachal culture, dominated by temptations and demons, developed an optimistic perspective of the salvation of the individual: "Penitence is the daughter of reliance and the abjuration of despair." (John of the Ladder 1864: col.
The Neamt Monastery is the most ancient monachal emplacement in Moldavia, as a result of monastical heritage left by Petru Mu[section]at, Alexander the Good and Stephen the Great.
"Rtsod pa: The Monachal Disputation in Tibet", Indo-Iranian Journal, Vol.8, 1964.
This article attempts an approach to the history of the reading-writing practice in the monachal communities during the 17th and 18th centuries.