monad


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mo·nad

 (mō′năd′)
n.
1. Philosophy An indivisible, impenetrable unit of substance viewed as the basic constituent element of physical reality in the metaphysics of Leibniz.
2. Biology A single-celled microorganism, especially a flagellate protozoan formerly classified in the taxonomic group Monadina.

[Latin monas, monad-, unit, from Greek, from monos, single; see men- in Indo-European roots.]

mo·nad′ic (mə-năd′ĭk), mo·nad′i·cal adj.
mo·nad′i·cal·ly adv.
mo′nad·ism n.

monad

(ˈmɒnæd; ˈməʊ-)
npl -ads or -ades (-əˌdiːz)
1. (Philosophy) philosophy
a. any fundamental singular metaphysical entity, esp if autonomous
b. (in the metaphysics of Leibnitz) a simple indestructible nonspatial element regarded as the unit of which reality consists
c. (in the pantheistic philosophy of Giordano Bruno) a fundamental metaphysical unit that is spatially extended and psychically aware
2. (Biology) a single-celled organism, esp a flagellate protozoan
3. (Chemistry) an atom, ion, or radical with a valency of one
Also called (for senses 1, 2): monas
[C17: from Late Latin monas, from Greek: unit, from monos alone]
moˈnadical adj
moˈnadically adv

mon•ad

(ˈmɒn æd, ˈmoʊ næd)

n.
1. a flagellated protozoan, esp. of the genus Monas.
2. an element, atom, or group having a valence of one.
3. Philos. an indivisible metaphysical entity, esp. one having an autonomous life.
4. a single unit or entity.
[1605–15; < Late Latin monad- (s. of monas) < Greek (s. of monás): unity. See mon-, -ad1]
mo•nad•ic (məˈnæd ɪk) mo•nad′i•cal, mo•nad′al, adj.

monad

any simple, single-cell organism. — monadic, monadical, monadal, adj.
See also: Cells

monad

Spritual individuality that is reincarnated.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.monad - (chemistry) an atom having a valence of onemonad - (chemistry) an atom having a valence of one
chemical science, chemistry - the science of matter; the branch of the natural sciences dealing with the composition of substances and their properties and reactions
atom - (physics and chemistry) the smallest component of an element having the chemical properties of the element
2.monad - a singular metaphysical entity from which material properties are said to derivemonad - a singular metaphysical entity from which material properties are said to derive
1, ace, one, single, unity, I - the smallest whole number or a numeral representing this number; "he has the one but will need a two and three to go with it"; "they had lunch at one"
3.monad - (biology) a single-celled microorganism (especially a flagellate protozoan)
microorganism, micro-organism - any organism of microscopic size
biological science, biology - the science that studies living organisms
Translations

monad

[ˈmɒnæd] Nmónada f

monad

n
(Philos) → Monade f
(Biol: dated) → Einzeller m
(Chem) → einwertiges Element or Atom or Radikal

monad

[ˈmɒnæd] n (Chem, Philosophy) → monade f
References in classic literature ?
Molecule .) According to Leibnitz, as nearly as he seems willing to be understood, the monad has body without bulk, and mind without manifestation -- Leibnitz knows him by the innate power of considering.
Genius watches the monad through all his masks as he performs the metempsychosis of nature.
Phases Number of Number of Abnormalities Number analyzed abnormal of cells cells cells Metaphase I 142 32 Non-oriented 12 chromosome Stickiness 20 Anaphase I 162 48 Laggards 38 Laggards and 10 precocious migration Telophase I 190 16 Micronuclei 16 Prophase II 176 12 Micronuclei 12 Metaphase II 216 24 precocious migration 02 Stickiness 22 Anaphase II 130 46 Laggards 18 Stickiness 28 Telophase II 152 16 Micronuclei 16 Tetrad with 10 micronuclei Triad 11 Triad with microcyte 18 Tetrad 204 82 Dyad 22 Dyad with microcyte 10 Monad 07 Monad with microcyte 04
He had conjured 17 wins from a modest team of 14 in his first season and he had comfortably exceeded that tally in his second; just before the sale he had taken Golden Monad to France and recorded a prestigious victory in the Prix Henri Delamarre at Longchamp.
Levin, a historian, and Watkins, a literary critic, join forces in order to mount an indirect argument about how they think the English came to see England "as a unique social, political, and cultural space--a kind of monad insulated from the rest of Europe" (14).
takes clear aim at several, mostly philosophical errors (e.g., at the deus exlex of nominalism and at the overly apophatic approaches of contemporary theology); he persuasively corrects barbaric atomistic interpretations of the windowless monad. Nonetheless, H.'s focus remains especially on Leibniz's theology, as he offers a noteworthy, enlightening, and provocative reading of that theology.
The universities which would come up after the governor approves the Bills include Babu Banarasi Das University, Institute of Foreign Trade and Management University, Noida International University, Sri Venkateshwara University and Monad University.
viridulus distribution at a 1 x 1-km grid square level (monad) on a map of Essex Co., using MapInfo Version 8.0 software.
Much of the recent scholarship shows a clear preference for moving to a monad composed solely of submarines armed with submarine-launched ballistic missiles (SLBM) until the United States ultimately disarms.
In the 1690s, Leibniz developed the ideas of the pre-established harmony of the world as well as of the monad, the latter a term not new to Leibniz, but associated with his view that the world is constituted of wholly distinct and individual substantial forms.
In short, friend-enemy is a monad produced through the folds that constitute the political.
The chapters that follow pursue a fascinating zigzag path that leads us through John Mitchell's "ley lines" and Atlantis (an atemporal topos closely allied to that of /Egypt); the "reactualization" of Giordano Bruno's worldview in the work of Dame Frances Yates and the consequent "magical" aspect of her comparative methodology; a comparison of Bruno's epistemology with that of structural linguistics; a decidedly eccentric but nevertheless brilliant reading of John Dee's Hieroglyphic Monad in terms of the ritual ontology of Japanese Noh theatre ("We need a new perspective," writes Lehrich); and an account of Athanasius Kirchner as a precursor of the comparative and structural tradition.