monarchy

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mon·ar·chy

 (mŏn′ər-kē, -är′-)
n. pl. mon·ar·chies
1. Government by a monarch.
2. A state ruled or headed by a monarch.

[Middle English monarchie, from Old French, from Latin monarchia, from Greek monarkhiā, from monarkhos, monarch; see monarch.]

mo·nar′chi·al (mə-när′kē-əl) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

monarchy

(ˈmɒnəkɪ)
n, pl -chies
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a form of government in which supreme authority is vested in a single and usually hereditary figure, such as a king, and whose powers can vary from those of an absolute despot to those of a figurehead
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a country reigned over by a king, prince, or other monarch
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

mon•ar•chy

(ˈmɒn ər ki)

n., pl. -chies.
1. a government or state in which the supreme power is actually or nominally lodged in a monarch.
2. supreme power or sovereignty held by a single person.
3. the fact or state of being a monarchy.
[1300–50; Middle English < Late Latin < Greek]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

monarchy

1. a governmental system in which supreme power is actually or nominally held by a monarch.
2. supreme power and authority held by one person; autocracy. — monarchie, monarchical, adj.
See also: Government
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

monarchy

A form of government headed by a hereditary ruler, such as a king or queen, or a country with this form of government.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.monarchy - an autocracy governed by a monarch who usually inherits the authoritymonarchy - an autocracy governed by a monarch who usually inherits the authority
autocracy, autarchy - a political system governed by a single individual
parliamentary monarchy - a monarchy having a parliament
kingdom - a monarchy with a king or queen as head of state
empire - a monarchy with an emperor as head of state
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

monarchy

noun
1. sovereignty, despotism, autocracy, kingship, absolutism, royalism, monocracy a debate on the future of the monarchy
2. kingdom, empire, realm, principality The country was a monarchy until 1973.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
الحُكومه المَلَكيهمَلْكِيةٌ
monarchie
monarki
monarkia
monarhija
monarchia
konungsríki; einvaldsríki; konungsveldi
君主制
군주제
monarchija
monarchia
monarhija
monarki
การปกครองโดยมีพระมหากษัตริย์เป็นประมุข
chế độ quân chủ

monarchy

[ˈmɒnəkɪ] Nmonarquía f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

monarchy

[ˈmɒnərki] n
(= system) → monarchie f
when France was a monarchy → lorsque la France était une monarchie
the monarchy (= royal family) → la monarchie
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

monarchy

nMonarchie f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

monarchy

[ˈmɒnəkɪ] nmonarchia
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

monarch

(ˈmonək) noun
a king, queen, emperor, or empress.
ˈmonarchyplural ˈmonarchies noun
(a country etc that has) government by a monarch.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

monarchy

مَلْكِيةٌ monarchie monarki Monarchie μοναρχία monarquía monarkia monarchie monarhija monarchia 君主制 군주제 monarchie monarki monarchia monarquia монархия monarki การปกครองโดยมีพระมหากษัตริย์เป็นประมุข kraliyet chế độ quân chủ 君主国
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009
References in classic literature ?
Have republics in practice been less addicted to war than monarchies? Are not the former administered by MEN as well as the latter?
Yet were they as often engaged in wars, offensive and defensive, as the neighboring monarchies of the same times.
"I am an admirer of Montesquieu," replied Prince Andrew, "and his idea that le principe des monarchies est l'honneur me parait incontestable.
*"The principle of monarchies is honor seems to me incontestable.
However, there's always the possibility that the British monarchy might eventually be abolished, given the trend where several monarchies all over the world have folded up in the twentieth century.
Of the EU's current 28 members, seven are monarchies, with Norway providing an eighth example of successful monarchy in western Europe.
It ends with the interesting fact that seven of the top nations in a table of happiness and prosperity are monarchies.
"Historically, monarchies have disappeared either because of state collapse or because of catastrophic loss in war 6 close to, but not quite the same thing, in the cases of Austro-Hungary and the Balkan monarchies."
Pollack, the director of the Saban Center for Middle East policy at the Brookings Institution, said: 'What the monarchies have going for them are royal families that allow them to stand above the fray, to a certain extent.
If we compare this to the situation in our region following the so-called Arab Spring, we will see that the most stable states are monarchies or emirates, where there is no injustice, oppression or violations, rather the Arab monarchies are providing lessons in wisdom and flexibility, or what Hague described as a very pragmatic approach.
Second, and more surprising, is the relative resilience of the Arab monarchies to the Arab Spring: Morocco and Jordan, Saudi Arabia and Oman, Kuwait and the United Arab Emirates, and Qatar and Bahrain have been reasonably unaffected and remain stable (in spite of the temporary clashes in Bahrain and their oppression with the help of Saudi Arabia's army).
Le Premier ministre de Bahrein a defendu hier dimanche un projet d'union des monarchies du Golfe, qui doit etre discute lors d'un sommet regional lundi a Riyad, mais que l'opposition chiite bahreinie a d'ores et deja critique, exigeant un referendum.