monarchism

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mon·ar·chism

 (mŏn′ər-kĭz′əm, -är′-)
n.
1. The system or principles of monarchy.
2. Belief in or advocacy of monarchy.

mon′ar·chist (-kĭst) n.
mon′ar·chis′tic adj.

mon•ar•chism

(ˈmɒn ərˌkɪz əm)

n.
1. the principles of monarchy.
2. advocacy of monarchical rule.
[1830–40; compare French monarchisme, German Monarchismus]
mon′ar•chist, n., adj.
mon`ar•chist′ic, adj.

monarchism

the doctrines and principles of a monarchical government. — monarchist, n.monarchical, adj.
See also: Government
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.monarchism - a belief in and advocacy of monarchy as a political systemmonarchism - a belief in and advocacy of monarchy as a political system
ideology, political orientation, political theory - an orientation that characterizes the thinking of a group or nation
Translations

monarchism

[ˈmɒnəkɪzəm] N (= system) → monarquía f; (= advocacy of monarchy) → monarquismo m

monarchism

n (= system)Monarchie f; (= advocacy of monarchy)Monarchismus m

monarchism

[ˈmɒnəkɪzm] nmonarchia
References in periodicals archive ?
In this volume, the main thrust is on the media that conveyed and revealed the goals and ideals, monarchistic propaganda that saturated pre-revolutionary Russian media, and its interplay with the wider context of both Russian society and the myth-making machinery of the monarchic ideal itself.
(12.) "Monday Opera Club of Exclusive Five Hundred Becomes Center of Monarchistic Restoration Movement," Jewish Telegraphic Agency, December 11, 1924.
Petersburg to Paris worshipped the idea of the enlightened yet absolute monarchy, the Polish Res Publica was in a phase of political stagnation, even as its official discourse remained republican and not monarchistic. Later, when the ideas of the Enlightenment were being discussed in the salons of Prussia or France, Poles tried to implement reforms of their republican political system (The Great Assembly [Sejm Wielki] that culminated in the Third of May Constitution in 1791), but this process came to an abrupt halt due to the invasion of Poland by "enlightened" European rulers, an invasion that ended with the second partition (1793).