monetarism


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mon·e·ta·rism

 (mŏn′ĭ-tə-rĭz′əm, mŭn′-)
n.
1. A theory holding that economic variations within a given system, such as changing rates of inflation, are most often caused by increases or decreases in the money supply.
2. A policy that seeks to regulate an economy by altering the domestic money supply, especially by increasing it in a moderate but steady manner.

mon′e·ta·rist adj. & n.

monetarism

(ˈmʌnɪtəˌrɪzəm)
n
1. (Economics) the theory that inflation is caused by an excess quantity of money in an economy
2. (Economics) an economic policy based on this theory and on a belief in the efficiency of free market forces, that gives priority to achieving price stability by monetary control, balanced budgets, etc, and maintains that unemployment results from excessive real wage rates and cannot be controlled by Keynesian demand management
ˈmonetarist n, adj

mon•e•ta•rism

(ˈmɒn ɪ təˌrɪz əm, ˈmʌn-)

n.
a doctrine holding that changes in the money supply determine the direction of a nation's economy.
[1965–70, Amer.]
mon′e•ta•rist, n., adj.

monetarism

1. an economic theory maintaining that stability and growth in the economy are dependent on a steady growth rate in the supply of money.
2. the principle put forward by American economist Milton Friedman that control of the money supply and, thereby, of rate in the supply of credit serves to control inflation and recession while fostering prosperity. — monetarist, n., adj.
See also: Economics
an economie theory maintaining that stability and growth in the economy are dependent on a steady growth rate in the supply of money. — monetarist, n., adj.
See also: Money

monetarism

An economic policy based on controlling a country’s money supply.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.monetarism - an economic theory holding that variations in unemployment and the rate of inflation are usually caused by changes in the supply of moneymonetarism - an economic theory holding that variations in unemployment and the rate of inflation are usually caused by changes in the supply of money
economic theory - (economics) a theory of commercial activities (such as the production and consumption of goods)
Translations
monetarizam
monetaryzm

monetarism

[ˈmʌnɪtərɪzəm] Nmonetarismo m

monetarism

[ˈmʌnɪtərɪzəm] nmonétarisme m

monetarism

nMonetarismus m

monetarism

[ˈmʌnɪtˌrɪzm] nmonetarismo
References in periodicals archive ?
He knew everybody and everything that was going on in the world of monetarism and monetary policy in the United States and Europe.
Although the Tories in the past have brought us such delights as the poll tax, monetarism, negative eguity and riots, I am the first to admit that they have produced some of our greatest prime ministers such as Winston Churchill, Benjamin Disraeli and, er, Winston Churchill.
Monetarism insisted that if the supply of money grows faster than the amount of real wealth, the real value of the money will decline steadily through inflation.
In their theoretical hearts, most monetary economists believe in some form of monetarism, that if a central bank prints enough money, ultimately prices must rise.
In this time of monetarism, mayhem and fear of safety in this frightening world, it was a wonderful couple of hours of escapism.
I've spent countless hours with him," Wanniski continued,"explaining why it was Keynesianism and Monetarism that made life so difficult for black folks, that there was no conspiracy.
I'm still a monetarist at heart -- and consider monetarism somewhat akin to malaria: Once it's in your system, you may be symptom-free for a period of time, but it never leaves you.
Macro-economics has within it the split between Keynesianism and monetarism, and within the former that between changes in public and private spending, the latter as affected by tax changes.
One will also find a close analysis of conservative economic ideology as it impinged on Reagan-- supply-side economics, monetarism, orthodox budget balancing--and how Reagan played these off against one another to his own political advantage.
In the last election, voters were fed up with the "soft shoe fascism" peddled by the followers of monetarism.
That laughable level of funding has long been a source of resentment, but in a political environment where free-market monetarism has become the economic orthodoxy and successive governments have dismantled health and welfare systems that once were the envy of the world, funding for the arts and culture goes to the end of a long queue.
By focusing only on what was "Latin American" about economic thinking, Love overlooks what most Latin American economists and policy-makers relied upon as their intellectual arsenal: Keynesianism and monetarism.