monetarism


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mon·e·ta·rism

 (mŏn′ĭ-tə-rĭz′əm, mŭn′-)
n.
1. A theory holding that economic variations within a given system, such as changing rates of inflation, are most often caused by increases or decreases in the money supply.
2. A policy that seeks to regulate an economy by altering the domestic money supply, especially by increasing it in a moderate but steady manner.

mon′e·ta·rist adj. & n.

monetarism

(ˈmʌnɪtəˌrɪzəm)
n
1. (Economics) the theory that inflation is caused by an excess quantity of money in an economy
2. (Economics) an economic policy based on this theory and on a belief in the efficiency of free market forces, that gives priority to achieving price stability by monetary control, balanced budgets, etc, and maintains that unemployment results from excessive real wage rates and cannot be controlled by Keynesian demand management
ˈmonetarist n, adj

mon•e•ta•rism

(ˈmɒn ɪ təˌrɪz əm, ˈmʌn-)

n.
a doctrine holding that changes in the money supply determine the direction of a nation's economy.
[1965–70, Amer.]
mon′e•ta•rist, n., adj.

monetarism

1. an economic theory maintaining that stability and growth in the economy are dependent on a steady growth rate in the supply of money.
2. the principle put forward by American economist Milton Friedman that control of the money supply and, thereby, of rate in the supply of credit serves to control inflation and recession while fostering prosperity. — monetarist, n., adj.
See also: Economics
an economie theory maintaining that stability and growth in the economy are dependent on a steady growth rate in the supply of money. — monetarist, n., adj.
See also: Money

monetarism

An economic policy based on controlling a country’s money supply.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.monetarism - an economic theory holding that variations in unemployment and the rate of inflation are usually caused by changes in the supply of moneymonetarism - an economic theory holding that variations in unemployment and the rate of inflation are usually caused by changes in the supply of money
economic theory - (economics) a theory of commercial activities (such as the production and consumption of goods)
Translations
monetarizam
monetaryzm

monetarism

[ˈmʌnɪtərɪzəm] Nmonetarismo m

monetarism

[ˈmʌnɪtərɪzəm] nmonétarisme m

monetarism

nMonetarismus m

monetarism

[ˈmʌnɪtˌrɪzm] nmonetarismo
References in periodicals archive ?
The Thatcher government of the 1980s rejected Keynesian economics, in favour of a policy advocated by the economist Milton Friedman, which became known as "monetarism" which advocated, amongst other things, a strict control of the money supply.
Some things, like Clause 28, monetarism and one-hit kills, are best left in the Eighties.
We revolted against 39 years of economic dispossession and political oppression, beginning with the Callaghan Government's turn to monetarism in 1977.
Whereas the Great Depression of the 1930s produced Keynesian economics, and the stagflation of the 1970s produced Milton Friedman's monetarism, the Great Recession has produced no similar intellectual shift.
Beyond its rarity, this book will illuminate and expand any mind that is aware of how contemporary monetary policy is assessed primarily in formal or technical ways, with arcane models and analyses of such matters as bounded rationality, inflation targeting, quantitative easing, the zero lower bound of interest rates, "market monetarism," and the Taylor Rule.
In this discussion of the security of the euro, the author reviews the advantages and disadvantages of both Keynesian monetary theory and monetarism and develops a new approach to monetary theory that combines the best of both systems for controlling the economy.
Monetarism was the mother and unregulated capitalism and austerity its children.
Ian Hockley, another British expatriate in Oman, said leaving the EU is about entrenching the UK establishment and monetarism even more.
Sumner, who is often called the father of "market monetarism," in many ways revives a classical way of looking at the world.
These include concerns with 'cost-push inflation' (blaming the unions), the nature of the balance of payments constraint, beliefs about the unemployment-inflation trade-off (depicted by the Phillips curve), the influence of monetarism, the effects of floating the dollar, concern with the 'wage overhang' (oh dear, unions again!) and much more.
Socialists have their own "we are for the workers" policies that engender public sector spending regardless of cost, whilst the Conservatives believe that Big Business and monetarism is the way to solve the problem.
He wrote Testing Monetarism, a critique of monetarism, in 1981.Desai has written extensively publishing over 200 articles in academic journals and had a regular column in the British radical weekly Tribune during 1985 1994, in the Indian business daily Business Standard (1995-2001) and in Indian Express and Financial Express.